BIOGRAPHIES

Copyright 2013 - Liz Robertson                                                                                Back to Home Page

The below biographies are reprinted from the book "MEMOIRS OF GEORGIA", Historical and Biographical Sketches, by 
S. Emmett Lucas, Jr., PUBLISHED IN 1896.


These may have been 'paid' bios since they do not include all the county leaders of that time.  Notes have been added as to place of burial
and birth and death dates where known.

The Family Sketches (indicated by red font) are submitted by researchers shown in column two. We cannot print complete family trees here
but only brief sketches of families in Carroll County in the early 1800s

CARROLL COUNTY BIOGRAPHIES AND FAMILY SKETCHES.
Biographies in Archives

"Memoirs of Georgia"                    SUBMITTED BY:
ADAMS, Z. T. "Memoirs of Georgia"
ADAMSON, G. R. "Memoirs of Georgia"
BAXTER, MOSES J. "Memoirs of Georgia"
BENFORD, JAMES H. L. "Memoirs of Georgia"
BONNER, GEORGE A "Memoirs of Georgia"
BONNER, REV. JOHN Kenny Shackleford
BONNER, JERUSH CARRIE Kenny Shackleford
BONNER, WILLIAM STEGALL Kenny Shackleford
BROWN, S. J. "Memoirs of Georgia"
BROWN, W. F. "Memoirs of Georgia"
BYRON, J. LEE, DR. Submitted by Don Bankston
BUNT, O. D. "Memoirs of Georgia"
BURNS, JAMES W. "Memoirs of Georgia"
CANDLER, WILLIAM B. "Memoirs of Georgia"
COLEMAN, W. A. "Memoirs of Georgia"
CRAWFORD, HENRY F. "Memoirs of Georgia"
CREEL, ELISHA "Memoirs of Georgia"
CULPEPPER, SR., JOHN F. "Memoirs of Georgia"
FIELDER, F. M. "Memoirs of Georgia"
FITTS, W. W. "Memoirs of Georgia"
FULLER, JUDSON T. "Memoirs of Georgia"
GAY, ALLEN M. "Memoirs of Georgia"
GRIFFIN, JAMES P. "Memoirs of Georgia"
GRIFFIN, R. L. "Memoirs of Georgia"
GROW, S. E. "Memoirs of Georgia"
HARMAN, ARTHUR D. "Memoirs of Georgia"
HARRIS, SAMPSON W. "Memoirs of Georgia"
HOGAN, HAMILTON "Memoirs of Georgia"
HOUSEWORTH, JOHN "Memoirs of Georgia"
HUTCHESON, ARTHUR "Memoirs of Georgia"
KELLEY, REV. W. W. "Memoirs of Georgia"
LASSETTER, J. R. "Memoirs of Georgia"
LASSETTER, J. W. G. "Memoirs of Georgia"
LOVVORN, W. D. "Memoirs of Georgia"
MALONE, WILLIAM H. "Memoirs of Georgia"
MARTIN, D. R. "Memoirs of Georgia"
MERRELL, WILLIAM WASHINGTON Unknown
MOORE, JAMES P. "Memoirs of Georgia"
MOORE, JAMES D. "Memoirs of Georgia"
MORRIS, C. D. "Memoirs of Georgia"
MORROW,  H. L. "Memoirs of Georgia"
MURPHEY, M. E. "Memoirs of Georgia"
MCBRAYER, WM. C. Submitted by Diane Crawford
M'CAIN, B. J. "Memoirs of Georgia"
M'DANIEL, G. A. "Memoirs of Georgia"
M'GARITY, JOHN C. "Memoirs of Georgia"
NIXON, WILEY "Memoirs of Georgia"
OGLETREE, WILLIAM T. "Memoirs of Georgia"
PARKER, HENRY G. "Memoirs of Georgia"
PRITCHETT, F. F. "Memoirs of Georgia"
REID, HENRY W. "Memoirs of Georgia"
ROBINSON, ALBERT C. "Memoirs of Georgia"
ROOP, MARTIN "Memoirs of Georgia"
ROOP, JOHN K. "Memoirs of Georgia"
ROOP, GEORGE W. "Memoirs of Georgia"
RUSSELL, MOSES R. "Memoirs of Georgia"
SIKES, F. FRANK "Memoirs of Georgia"
SIMONTON, ABNER A. "Memoirs of Georgia"
SHACKELFORD, JAMES CARLISLE Donnie Shackleford
SHACKELFORD, YOUNG LEE Kenny Shackleford
SHARP, B. A., "Memoirs of Georgia"
SHARPE, EDWIN R. "Memoirs of Georgia"
SPENCE, WILLIAM M. "Memoirs of Georgia"
STOVALL, SAMUEL "MORGAN CO. GA, HERITAGE"
STRICKLAND, HENRY H. "Memoirs of Georgia"
THOMASON, JAMES R. "Memoirs of Georgia"
TILLMAN, D. N. "Memoirs of Georgia"
TOLBERT, J. THOMAS "Memoirs of Georgia"
WILLIAMS, HENRY M. "Memoirs of Georgia"
WILLIAMSON, JASPER J "Memoirs of Georgia"
WORD, JOHN H. "Memoirs of Georgia"
YORK, JOSIAH COWAN, SR. Diane Stark Sanfilippo

Other biographies are located in Archives


SAMUEL STOVALL FAMILY
PIONEER
Samuel Stovall was born ci 1777 in Georgia. He died November 1847 in Morgan Co., GA. He married—Sarah-Arenton (Arrington) ci1799 (b-. 1770-80 VA; d. 25 May 1849 Morgan Co.,Ga.
They had eleven children.
Benjamin b. 1800-03, died after 1830.
Stephen Franklin b. 7 Oct. 1806, m. 26 Feb.
1829 (Morgan Co.) Frances Thomas, and died 6
Feb. 1858, buried in Stovall Cem., Hulett, Douglas
Co., GA. They had 8 children: Jefferson Cosby
1833-1862 m. Almedia Watkins;  Ann J. b. 1835;
Nancy b. 1838; Frances M. 1840-; Elizabeth M. b.
1843; Stephen Franklin Jr. 1844-1896 m. Sarah
C. Watkins, buried in Stovall Cem., Hulett; Lucy
Catherine 1846-1910 m. James D. Prichard;
Elisha Thomas 1849-1920 m. Arminda Ayers. 
Richard D. b. 23 March 1809, d. 7 April 1867,
m. Emma Amanda Davis, and they are buried
in the Stovall Cem., Carrollton, GA. 
They had nine children: 
William 1834; 
Amanda 1836-1916; Mary 1840; Martha 1842;
 Nancy 1843-1923; Phillip H. 1845-1863; Samuel 1847;
James W. 1849; and Lydia 1852.
Lucy 1804-10 m. 9 Nov. 1826 Morgan Co. Larkin W. Allen, died before 1850. They had ten children.
Mary b. 1805/10 m. 21 December 1825 (Mor gan Co.) Willis Jones b. 1802. They had five or more children.
George W. b. 1811, m. 2 July 1835 (Morgan Co.) Elizabeth Towler, and died before 1880. They had ten children.
Elizabeth H. b. 1813, m. 22 December 1830
(Morgan Co.) Archibald Lester; 2nd m. 30 Jan.1849 Ransom B. Mallory, and died 15 August
1886, buried in Mallory’s Chapel in Morgan Co.
She had four children: John 0. Lester, Mary J.
Lester, Horace Augusta Mallory, and Alonzo R.
Mallory.
Isham b. 12 March 1814 (Morgan Co.), m. 8 December 1835 Emily Wright, and died 16 April 1900 in Atlanta, GA, burled in Prospect 
Cemetery Atlanta. They had ten children: Stephen Augustus b. 16 September 1836, d. 27 Sept. 1885 rn. Martha Bankston (had 2 children 
Albert Augustus who m. Corine Smith, and Ella Beatrice who mar ried Robert M. Clarke); Sarah Ann b. 1840, d. 16 December 1909,
 m. S. E. Dempsey; William Franklin 1842-1902 Atlanta, m. Mary F. Ragsdale; Columbus Cicero b. 1844, d. 17 December 1919 Atlanta,
 m. Martha E. Winchester; Virgus M. 1845-1865; George W. 1850-2933; Samuel Cornelius, 1851-1931; m. Beulah Turner, Clara Jaces;
Mary Antonette, b.1851- m. Henry Farmer;
Martha E. b. 1854;
Ida A. B. 1859, m. R. S. McWaters;
Samuel W. 1815-1864, burial Madison City Cem.
Ann, b. Mar. 1818, m. 24 Dec. 1841, Morgan Co. Ga.
Riley J. Baccus and died June 10, 1906
in Baccus, Marion Co., Alabama. 
My great great grandparents had sixteen children. (See Baccus Family).
Philip b. 1819, m. 26 Dec. 1843 Mary Ann Whitehead, died 11 June 1864 in Sumter Co. GA. They had 5 children: Frances R. b. 1846,
m. William H. Ponder; Elizabeth E. b. 1848, m. Joseph B. Adair; John H. b. 1849; Amanda Cor nelius m. Joseph B. Adair; and Dora b. 1863, 
m. Thomas Daniel.
Samuel Stovall was on the 1812 Morgan Co.
GA tax list. 
He was in the War of 1812 in Capt.
Jesse Thomas’ Co. 3 from November 21, 1814 to
March 8, 1815. 
He was a Justice of Peace 31 January 1817. 
He and his wife belonged to Sandy
Creek Baptist Church where he was a deacon.
His father was Benjamin Stovall b. ci 1755
Granville Co. NC, m. Anne Whitehead, died 1828
Oglethorpe Co., GA. 
Benjamin’s father was John
Stovall b. cl71l Henrico Co., VA M.. Dorcas, died
c1781 Granville Co., NC. 
John’s father waS Bartholomew Stovall b. 24 Aug. 1665 in Albury,
Surrey, England, m. Anne Burton, died 1721 Henrico Co., VA 
Bartholomew’s father was George Stovall who m. Joane Tickner in England. 
There are many descendants of the Stovall
Family. 
Bartholomew, the immigrant, came to
VA in 1684. 
There are in GA descendants of
three of his five sons. 
Submitted by: Ina Burnett Morris.
505 Suites Row, San Antonio, TX.
MADISON CITY CEMETERY, MORGAN COUNTY, GA. 
Stovall, George B.            1835        1906        Co. D, 3rd GA Regt.
                                                      C.S.A.
Stovall, George B., Jr.       1873        1899        
Stovall, Laura Arnold         1838        1921
Stovall, Samuel                           2/5/1864    Co. G, Cobb's Legion
                                                      C.S.A.
Stovall, Thomas H.            1857        1931
STOVALL CEMETERY, CARROLL CO., GA.
STOVALL, Emma         
born Jul 13, 1814; died Apr 1, 1895  
          
STOVALL, Amanda
born Dec 6, 1835; died Apr 20, 1916
d/o Richard and Emma Stovall   
 
STOVALL, Richard
born Mar 23, 1809; died Apr 7, 1867  
 
STOVALL, Nancy          
born May 18, 1843; died Feb 28, 1923 
d/o Richard and Emma Stovall         
 
STOVALL, Phillip F         
born May 14, 1845; died May 25, 1863
s/o Richard and Emma Stovall 
 
From FamilySearch Org. 
RICHARD D STOVALL
 
Birth:  23 MAR 1809   , , Georgia 
Death:  07 APR 1867    
Marriages: 
  Spouse:  EMMA AMANDA DAVIS    Marriage:  22 AUG 1832  Return to Top

WILLIAM WASHINGTON MERRELL  (This biography has been submitted, however, the contributor did not know the source of the document)

Was born in Gumlog District, Franklin County, Georgia, September 15, 1815. He was a remarkable man in many respects, and one who was loved and respected by his fellow-citizens. Like most pioneers, he underwent many privations. He wrote an autobiography. from which I shall quote at intervals, which will portray his early and latter day environments better than others can do. Of his early life, he says:

"My parents were poor. and being the eldest son, could be but little spared to go to school, and had I had the time the school facilities were poor. At the age of seventeen I moved to Carroll County with my parents, brothers and sisters, eight in number. At this period I could read and write a little. My chances for obtaining an education were not promoted by the removal to this county, for we settled on Turkey Creek, ten miles from the court house, and were without school books or newspapers. Our neighbors were few and all were poor and ignorant, and they seemed to care for nothing but hunting game, which was plentiful. A small corn patch sufficed for bread and their stock lived upon the range. As may be supposed, I fell into that mode of life. When not thus engaged I worked on the farm to help support the family.

"Corn was scarce and the price high. Our nearest mill was eleven miles; the grist was carried to it on horseback. We were ofcen without meat, except such as was killed in the forest. This changed as soon as we had time to raise hogs and beef cattle of our own.

"There was but little money in the country, and no market, and as a matter of course nothing to sell except a few skins which were sold to itinerant traders. We can not say that the hard experiences of these years were not a benefit to us in after life. It taught the lessons of industry, thrift and economy, which we otherwise might have failed to acquire. It taught the salutory lesson: “Live within your means.”

He served for a period of seven months in the Seminole War in 1836, in which he had many encounters with the wily red men, whom Chief Billv Bowlegs so successfully handled in the Florida everglades and who withstood the whole United States’ forces for a period of four years; and was finally captured by treachery.

He was twice married. His first wife was Miss Mary Durham by whom he had six children, four boys and two girls. His second wife was Miss Lucy A. Awtry, by whom he had nine children — eight sons and one daughter.

Of his first marriage he says:

"When I was married I had a horse, bridle and saddle, worth $60, and some cattle and horses worth $40. This was all I possessed of this world's goods, but I had health and was able and willing to work. I entered the battle of life with courage and a determination to succeed.”

And he did succeed. At the age of thirty he began the study of law. and was admitted to the bar in 1845. As a barrister he was honest and capable. In his chosen profession he achieved considerable success, having a clientage from all portions of the country.

He served the county at various times in the legislature, both as representative and as State Senator. During his public career he was United States Commissioner for a number of years, which office was administered to the satisfaction of the people and the government.

It is the consensus of opinion that he was an honest conscientious citizen: true to his convictions, faithful to all public trusts, and a devoted Christian gentleman.

        ===========================================================================================
WILLIAM WASHINGTON MERRELL was the son of Benjamin Smith Merrell and Martha "Patsey" Chandler. His wife ws Mary DURHAM, born 24 Apr 1819 in Spartanburg, S. C., died 15 Jan. 1854, Carroll Co., GA. They were married 19 Sept. 1837 in Carroll Co., GA.
Their children were: Mary Jane Merrell bn 3 Oct 1841
William Perry MERRELL bn 11 Mar. 1846 Died 11 Apr. 1932
Sarah Rebecca MERRELL bn 20 Mar. 1844 Died 9 Feb. 1914
John Newton MERRELL bn 14 Jul 1838, Died 27 Aug. 1838
George Washington MERRELL bn. 16 Aug 1839 Died 15 Dec.1918
Charles Henry MERRELL Bn. 25 Sept.1851 Died 12 Dec. 1910
Grisham Durham MERRELL Bn. 5 Nov. 1848 Died 17 Jul. 1914

(Note: A Complete GEDCOM file for this family is on line at the Family Search Org. at :  http://www.familysearch.org/
Select SEARCH and type in request).


MERRELL FAMILY CEMETERY, CARROLL CO., GA
MERRELL, WILLIAM W. BORN SEPT. 16, 1815 DIED MAY 21, 1900
MERRELL, MARY BORN APR 14 1819 DIED JAN. 15, 1851
MERRELL, HENRY FARMER BORN JUL 30, 1820 DIED JAN 7 1870
MERRELL, CLARISSA BORN OCT. 18, 1820 DIED MAY 22, 1854
MERRELL, THOMAS J M NO DATES CO, F, 19TH GA INF., CSA
MERRELL, BRYANT BORN SEP 16, 1889 S/O G D AND E G MERRELL
MERRELL, BENJAMIN SMITH BN APR 18, 1792 DIED SEPT. 25, 1823
MERRELL, MARTHA CHANDLER "PATSY" BORN SEP 4, 1795 DIED SEPT. 11, 1879

Carroll Co. Newspaper, Friday, June 13, 1884
Mrs. Sallie R. Carlton of Atlanta is in town visiting relatives.  She is a
daughter of Hon. W.W. Merrell.  Mrs. Carlton is accompanied by her two little
boys, Hal and Earnest.  They will remain several week.


File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by:
Dianne Crawford http://www.rootsweb.com/~archreg/vols/00014.html#0003452 September 18, 2006, 7:32 pm

Either Carroll Or Paulding County Paper June 1924
Candler Pays Tribute To the Memory of Wm. C. McBrayer

     In the year 1823 Andrew Erwin Mcbrayer, moved from North Carolina to
Georgia bringing with him health, strength and character--- nothing else.  He
lived to a good old age without a stain on his splendid character and left
sons and daughters, who never forgot or abused the heritage of a good name he
left them.
     Soon after his arrival in Georgia he contracted with Samuel Leathers to
work on his farm and married Miss Nancy Leathers in 1826.  He moved with his
young wife to a little farm on Sweetwater Creek, in Paulding county and raised
eight sons and two daughters. 
     A simple statement of a few common facts but not all the history that
Andrew E. McBrayer made.  The lands he cleared, the houses he built, the roads
he assisted in making with his own hands and better the splendid sons he gave
to his country, assets to the states-- not liabilities, for not one of them
was ever known to violate the law.  Are all parts of the history of Georgia. 
     He died at the age of 82 years, his wife living to the age of 95 years. 
     When the Civil War broke out five of his sons volunteered in  the
country's defense, fighting on until their commanders surrendered and then
returned home to their farms; making splendid citizens.
     King David of Israel, laid down the principal that as his post is that
goeth down to the battle.  So that his post be that tarrieth by the staff,
they shall fare alike.   So three sons among whom was William C.  McBrayer,
who remained at home and worked on the farm to feed and clothe their soldier
brothers on the battlefield were no less patriotic than the others who fought
in battle.  Coming to manhood he joined the Baptist church and married Miss
Delia Brown in the year 1873.  He served as postmaster at Draketown about
twelve years.  Several years as Justice of Peace, and served the people of
Haralson County as Tax Assessor for four terms. 
     Through all the years of his quiet life he was zealous of the untarnished
McBrayer name.  Faithful to every trust.  As husband, father, citizen and
christian gentleman;  very quietly on June 25, 1924 he fell asleep leaving his
children the heritage of a name, oftentimes better than silver or gold. 
     This tribute is written by a friend who knew him when we were little
boys, knew him in manhood, knew him to love him through all the years of his
quiet life.
     W.B. CANDLER, Villa Rica, Ga. 


Additional Comments:
William Clark McBrayer, son of Andrew Erwin McBrayer and Nancy Ann Leathers,
was born in Paulding County on Dec. 14, 1848.  He was married to Ardelia
Brown. 


 

William Stegall Bonner
File contributed by Kenny Shackleford


William Stegall Bonner, son of John Thomas Bonner and Martha M. Gillispie, was born in Carroll County, Georgia February 20, 1846. He is believed to have married two times though there is some confusion as to the surname of his first wife.

His first wife was known as Martha (Mattie) A. Baughman, a daughter of Nasa Jones and Mary Ann Bates. They were married in Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia December 31, 1868. She was born in Coweta County, Georgia March 25, 1840. She being 28 when she married William and having the surname of Baughman gives evidence to the possibility that she was married prior to her marriage to William. Though just conjecture with no evidence to prove this theory as fact it is this researcher's belief that she did marry and, taking into the consideration of the dates, her first husband may have died during the Civil War. As stated, conjecture and nothing more.

William Stegall Bonner and Martha (Mattie) are listed in the 1870 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia. William is listed as age 24, born in Georgia, occupation farmer. His wife is listed as Martha A., age 28, also born in Georgia. One child listed in household; Georgia A., less than 1 year of age born in Georgia.

Martha died in Carrollton, Carroll County May 24, 1878. She was buried at the Old Camp United Methodist Church Cemetery in Carroll County, Georgia. Five children were born to this union.

William married again August 29, 1878 in Carroll County, Georgia to Missouri Caroline Jones, sister of William's first wife Martha. She was born in Coweta County, Georgia October 31, 1847.

William Stegall Bonner and Missouri Caroline Jones are listed in the 1880 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia and are living in the Township of Carrollton. William is listed as 32 years of age, still a farmer. Missouri is listed as 32 years of age, born in Georgia. The children listed in the household are; Georgia A., age 10; William L., age 7; John T., age 6 and Robert A., age 5, all children of his first wife Martha. The other child is Saunders (Sanders), age 1. Sanders was a child of William and his wife Missouri. All of the children were born in Georgia.

William's father died during 1893 and William was appointed as an Executor of his Father's Will. He is listed in Item 21; "I hereby appoint my son W.S. Bonner, my Son in law John Pentecost and my beloved wife Lucy J. Bonner as Executors of this my last will and testament". The Will was filed in office August 30th 1893.

In the 1900 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia William and Missouri are living in the Township of Carrollton. William is listed as 53 years of age, born February 1847 and Missouri is listed as Zuri C., 52 years of age, born October 1848. The children listed in the household are; Sanders N., age 21, born March 1879; Berta B., age 19, born September 1881; Mollie E., age 18, born January 1882; Henry C., age 16, born January 1884; Cleovas (listed as Cleveland H.), age 14, born June 1886; James C., age 12, born October 1887 and Luther M., age 10, born October 1889. All of the children were born in Georgia.

Listed in the 1910 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia and living in Carrollton, William is listed as 65 years of age and Missouri C., is listed at age 63. There is one child still living at home; James C., age 21.

William and Missouri are last listed in the 1920 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia living in the City of Carrollton. They are listed in the home with their son Anderson Bonner. William is listed as 63 years of age. The age of William is incorrect in the census. His age should have been listed as 73. Missouri is 72. Robert Anderson Bonner is listed as Anderson and is head of the household. His age is listed as 43. He is listed as single.

A total of seven children were born to this union.

William Stegall Bonner died in Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia May 07, 1923 and Missouri Caroline Jones died in Draketown, Haralson County, Georgia January 16, 1924. They are also buried at the Old Camp United Methodist Church Cemetery in Carroll County, Georgia.

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF W.S. BONNER

Filed in office, this May 21, 1923; E.T. Steed,Ordinary

Georgia, Carroll County

I, W.S. Bonner, of said county, being of sound mind and disposing mind and memory, do make this my last will and testament, hereby revoking and annulling all others, by me heretofore made.

ITEM 1. I desire and direct my body be buried in a decent and Christianlike manner, suitable to my circumstances and condition in life.

ITEM 2. I desire and direct that all my just debts be paid without unnecessary delay, by my executor hereinafter named and appointed

ITEM 3. I give, bequeath and devise to my said wife, Missouri Caroline Bonner, all moneys, notes and accounts of which I may die possessed for and during her natural life, the income of which or so much thereof as is necessary shall be used for her support and to be used as she may desire, and she shall have full power to dispose of said income from said estate as she may deem proper.

ITEM 4. I give, and bequeath and devise to my said wife my pension, the same to be used for her own proper use and benefit.

ITEM 5. I hereby consitute and appoint my son, Robert Anderson Bonner, the sole executor of this my last will and testament, excusing him from making bond or making any returns to the Ordinarys Court of said County.

ITEM 6. I desire and direct that at the death of my said wife, Missouri Caroline Bonner, the executor shall distribute among my legal heirs an equal amount of said estate, taking into account the notes and accounts owing said estate by said heirs, so that each may share equally in said estate.

This November 16th, 1921 W.S.Bonner.

Signed, sealed and published by W.S. Bonner as his last will and testament, in the presence of us the undersigned, who subscribe our names hereto in the presence of said testator, after he had signed his name thereto, at his special instance and request, and in the presence of each other.

This November 16th, 1921

T.J.H.Robertson,; L.W.Stallings,; A.T.Cobb.

Codicil to W.S. Bonner's Will.

Georgia, Carroll County.

Whereas, I, W.S.Bonner, did on the 16th day of November 1921,sign, seal, declare and publish my last will and testament, in the presence of T.J.H.Robertson, L.W.Stallings, and A.T.Cobb, who signed said will and testament as witnesses.

And Whereas, I am desirous of adding an additional bequest and devise in said will, I, therefore, make and publish this codicil to said will and testament.

1. I hereby direct my executor, before distribution is made of my estate that the sum of Five Hundred Dollars, together with annual interest at the rate of eight per cent per annum from the first day of August, 1919 until said amount is paid, to be paid to my son, Robert Anderson Bonner. This Five Hundred dollars is in lieu of a like sum, which the said son, Robert Anderson Bonner, has paid me in the matter of furnishing me a home.

This October 28th, 1922

Recorded in Will Book C pg. 16-17

 

 

 


   Young Lee Shackelford
File contributed by Kenny Shackleford
 

   Young Lee Shackelford, son of John Harlin Shackelford and Jerusha Carrie Bonner, was born in Carroll County, Georgia January 23, 1882. He is listed in the 1900 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia at age 13.         

   Young Lee's father passed away one month before his tenth birthday. This led to hard times for Young. His mother, two older sisters and his younger brother, John Gay Shackelford, who was only six years of age, and Young Lee were left to take care of the farm John Harlin Shackelford had left behind. Being the oldest son, the chores of the farm would become one of his primary responsibilities.

   Soon after the turn of the century, Young's mother, Jerusha, married Sebron W. Millican. One day while working in the fields, Young Lee confronted Sebron and a violent argument ensued. This quickly evolved into a fight. Young Lee became very agitated and struck Sebron with a garden hoe, rendering him unconscious. Thinking that he had killed him, Young became frightened and ran away. Sebron quickly recovered and filed no charges. Jerusha, desperate to find her son, hired detectives to locate him. He was found several years later in Crenshaw County, Alabama, married and a father. Young Lee made two trips back to Georgia to see his mother, but only after he had learned of the death of Sebron. Jerusha made one trip to Alabama to see her son. After this last visit, they never saw each other again.

    Young Lee Shackelford came to Alabama in the early 1900s. He became associated with the Nichols family of Mount Ida, Crenshaw County, Alabama, when he was employed to work in a logging camp. The Nichols family was noted for their timber holdings. Through this association, he met Mary Alice Nichols. She was the second and only surviving child of George Marion Nichols and Mary Tabitha Engram. She was born November 11, 1889 at the home of her parents near the Mount Ida Community located near Brantley in Crenshaw County, Alabama. Young and Mary were married in Crenshaw County December 22, 1905.

   Young Lee and Mary Alice relocated in Petrey, Alabama, in the northeastern section of Crenshaw County. Young bought a farm and started to raise a family with Mary. Seven children were born over the next several years, but only two children survived infancy. During this period a devastating tornado struck and destroyed a considerable amount of Young's property. Due to overwhelming hardships, Young lost his farm in 1915. He returned to the logging camps and brought his family with him. Two more children were born to Mary Alice but they too, died in infancy. During the 1920s he worked as a Street Foreman for the Town of Brantley in Crenshaw County. In the summer of 1926, Young Lee became ill at work and was taken by train to Montgomery, Alabama, sixty miles away.  There he was rushed into surgery for a ruptured appendix. He never fully recovered and died at home September 23, 1926.

    After Young Lee's death Mary Alice, with her two surviving children, Zeddie and Ivera, moved to Carroll County, Georgia were they took up residence with Young's mother, Jerusha Carrie Bonner-Shackelford.  They attempted to stay in Georgia and help Jerusha with the farm. However, in 1929, they returned to Crenshaw County, Alabama.  Zeddie, only surviving son of Young and Mary left home in 1930 when he married. Ivera married in 1935 to Clarence Chance but Mary stayed with them until her death September 14, 1953. She died in a diabetic coma at the Troy Hospital in Troy, Pike County, Alabama.          

   Mary and Young are buried at the Smith Chapel Cemetery, known as Petrey Cemetery, in Petrey, Crenshaw County, Alabama.

   Nine children were born to Mary and Young but only two survived childhood. They were Ivera and Zeddie. The children who died as infants were; Infant daughter, still-born October 01, 1906; John Marion Shackelford, born February 04, 1910 and died April 05, 1910; Infant daughter and twin to Ivera, born and died February 23, 1912;  Joel Donovan Shackelford, born January 06, 1914 and died September 06, 1914. These children were born and died in Petrey, Crenshaw County, Alabama and are buried at the Smith Chapel Cemetery, known as Petrey Cemetery, in Petrey, Crenshaw County, Alabama. The remaining infants were; Infant son, still-born unknown; and two infants, sex unknown, still born. They were born in the Rocky Hill Community of Crenshaw County, Alabama and are buried at the Cameron's Chapel Cemetery in the Rocky Hill Community.

From Robert Wayne Shackelford

    I want to learn if the folk-lore is true that your grandfather and my grandfather decided to visit each other without advising each other, and saw each other on trains headed to the other's hometown as the trains met in Birmingham. 

Obituary of Mary Alice Nichols from the Montgomery Advertiser, September 15, 1953. 

SHACKELFORD, Mary Alice, 63, died at Troy Hospital Monday night. Surviving are two children, Zeddie Shackleford and Mrs. Vera Chance, both of Brantley; five grandchildren. Funeral services will be held today at 10:00 A.M. from Spring Hill Church. Burial will be in Smith Chapel Cemetery, with Turner's funeral in charge. 

The Parents of Mary Alice Nichols 

   George Marion Nichols was born on his father's farm in the Rocky Hill Community near Brantley in Pike County, now Crenshaw County, Alabama May 12, 1861. He married in Crenshaw County December 21, 1884 to Mary Tabitha Engram. She was born in Pike County, Alabama December 14, 1861.

   For the better part of his life, George worked as a farmer and in the lumber business on the land owned by his father.  This land was in the Mount Ida Community. Some of the land is still the property of relatives. George and his wife Mary attended the Cameron's Chapel Church, said to be partially founded by George's father Joel. Cameron's Chapel Methodist Church is located in what use to be known as the "Rocky Hill Community" of Crenshaw County, Alabama.

    George died at home on August 29, 1915. Mary preceded him in death on December 30, 1902, in Crenshaw County. They are both buried at the Cameron's Chapel Cemetery behind the Church.

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                                        Jerusha Carrie Bonner
                                           
File Contributed by Kenny Shackleford

 
Jerusha Carrie Bonner, daughter and first child of John Thomas Bonner and his second wife Martha Ann (Mattie) Upchurch, was born in Carroll County, Georgia August 12, 1858, most likely Carrollton. She is listed at age 11 in the 1870 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia. Jerusha married three times. Her first husband was John Harlin Shackelford, son of James Joseph Carlisle Shackelford and Margaret A. Forbes. He was born in Pike County, Georgia August 08, 1854. Carroll County Courts issued the Marriage License on June 04, 1876.

   John Harlin Shackelford was eight years old when his father left to fight in the Civil War and would remain the oldest male in the Shackelford family until his father's return in 1865. During this time his mother Margaret did have some help in the home other than by John. This help was provided by Margaret E. Smith, who was listed as living in the household of James Shackelford in the 1860 Carroll County Census. It is possible that Margaret was a sister of James, father of John. By the year 1870, when John was only 16 years of age, he had been removed from school and given the job of keeping the farm for his father. This would be the life long occupation for John Harlin. After John married Jerusha he became a member of the Old Camp United Methodist Church, founded by John Bonner, Jerusha's father. He was also minister there.

   John Harlin died in Carroll County December 20, 1891. John Harlin died at the young age of 37 years. The cause of his death is believed to have been accidental or by some unknown illness. A Petition for the estate of John Harlin Shackelford was presented to the Honorable Court of Ordinary of Carroll County; Georgia by his widow, Jerusha Carrie Bonner-Shackelford on January 29, 1892. The estate was settled in March of the same year. John was buried at the Old Camp Church Cemetery in Carroll County, Georgia.

   Four children were born to the union of Jerusha and John.

   Jerusha Carrie Ann Bonner, widow of John Harlin Shackelford, is listed in the 1900 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia. Jerusha is listed as Jerutha, age 42, born July 1857 in Georgia. Her two sons are listed in the home with her. They are; Young L., age 18, born January 1882; and John G., age 15, born April 1885. Both children were born in Georgia.

   Jerusha married for a second time in Carroll County January 10, 1901 to Seabron Washington Millican, son of Thomas Millican, Jr., and Louisa Wiles Ward. He was born in DeKalb County, Georgia July 16, 1843.

   Seabron was married prior to Mary Frances Pentecost. Mary Frances Pentecost was a sister of John Wesley Pentecost who married Georgia Patience Bonner, sister of Jerusha. She was born in Georgia, County unknown November 25, 1854 and died in Carroll County June 17, 1899. Ten children were born to that union. They were; Cora Emma,   Walter Jackson, Thomas Jefferson, Joseph Andrew, Robert Morris, Cornila Eugene, Georgia Elizabeth, John Riley, Homer Alvin, and Emerson. He had enlisted before this marriage in the Confederate Army on March 04, 1862 and served as a Private. No information in regards to his war record has been found.

   While working in the fields, Young Lee Shackelford, a son of Jerusha and John Harlin Shackelford confronted Sebron and a violent argument ensued. This quickly evolved into a fight. Young Lee became very agitated and struck Sebron with a garden hoe, rendering him unconscious. Thinking that he had killed him, Young became frightened and ran away. Sebron quickly recovered and filed no charges. Jerusha, desperate to find her son, hired detectives to locate him. He was found several years later in Crenshaw County, Alabama, married and a father. However, Seabron lived but a short time after that incident dying October 27, 1903 in Roopville, Carroll County, Georgia. He was buried at the New Lebanon Cemetery in Carroll County.

   No children were born to the union of Jerusha and Seabron.

   Jerusha Carrie Ann Bonner, widow of John Harlin Shackelford, is listed in the 1910 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia. Jerusha is listed as Jerusha C. Millican, age 52. She is listed as a boarder in the home with James L. and Carrie Felder.

    The third and last husband of Jerusha was William (Billy) Godbee, son of Stephen A. Godbee and Jincy West. He was born in Burke County, Georgia, estimated at about 1855 and died in Carroll County, Georgia before 1930. No information has been found prior to any marriages before Jerusha though it is likely that he was married. Though unknown he may be buried at the Godbee Family Cemetery in College Park, Georgia.

   Jerusha is listed in the 1930 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia as Jerusha C. Godbee, age 73. Living in the home with her is Robert Shackelford, listed as a nephew, age 19, born in Georgia. Robert was a son of John Gay Shackelford, Jerusha's youngest son. He is listed with his family living near Jerusha. She had transferred her membership to Stripling Chapel Methodist Church in Carroll County where her son John was a member.

   Jerusha passed away at the age of 84, February 28, 1943. The cause of her death was ruled a cerebral hemorrhage. She is buried along with her first husband, John Harlin Shackelford, at the Old Camp United Methodist Church in Carroll County. She was known by her grand children as Granny Doole.

 

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF JERUSHA CARRIE GODBEE 

Carroll County; Carrollton, Georgia,  August 20, 1942 

   This being my last Will and and all previous Wills revoked and cancelled, I desire that all of my real estate and personal belongings to be sold, and after all my debts, funeral expenses, and a suitable tombstone be places at my grave that the remaining money from my estate and personal belongings to be divided as follows:

   To my daughter, Mrs. Annie McLendon, one fourth or a child's part if she is still living. If not, her children to share equally in her part.

   Also, my daughter, Mrs. Henry McNeil, to receive one fourths of a child's part if she is still living. If not, her part to be be divided equally among her children.

   Also one fourth or a child's part to be divided equally among the children of my son Young, who is dead.

   Also one fourth, or a child's part to be divided equally among the children of my son Gay, who is dead.

   I also request that John Martin be administrator of my estate and see my wishes are carried out as I directed.  

Signed:  Mrs. J. C. Godbee 

OBITUARY OF JERUSHA CARRIE ANN GODBEE 

MRS J. C. A. GODBEE, OF VEAL COMMUNITY, IS CLAIMED BY DEATH 

   Mrs. Jerusha Carrie Ann Godbee, affectionately known as "Aunt Dool" by her numerous friends, died early Sunday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. L. McLendon, in the Veal Community, followed by a short illness.

   She was born in Carroll County, Georgia, July 12, 1858, the daughter of John Milton and Mattie Upchurch-Bonner. as a young lady she joined the Old Camp Ground M.E. Church, later moving her membership to Stripling Chapel where she was a member at the time of her death. as a young lady she married Mr. John Shackelford who died a number of years ago. She later married Mr. Seaborn Millican who has been dead quite some time. Later she married Mr. Billy Godbee who died several years ago. For a number of years she made her home in the Rocky Mount Community and for some time she lived at Star Point. However, during the last few years she made her home with her children.

   Two sons, John Gay Shackelford and Young Shackelford, preceded her in death.

Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. H. A. McNeil, of Newnan; Mrs. McLendon, of Bowdon, Route 1; 16 grandchildren, a number of great grandchildren; two brothers, Tom Bonner of Cullman, Alabama, and Bob Bonner, of Vendervent, Arkansas. Three sisters, Mrs. Aubrey Husley, of Carrollton, Mrs John Pentecost, of Roopsville, and Mrs. Ella Baker, of Atlanta.

   Funeral services were held from the Old Camp Ground Methodist Church Monday at 2:30 PM with Rev. Adrian Warwick and Rev. J. K. Brown officiating. Internment was at the church cemetery. 

Note: According to the obituary of Jerusha, it lists her father as John Milton Bonner. This is incorrect, her father was John Thomas Bonner, not John Milton. John Milton Bonner was the brother of Jerusha. 

 

The Parents of John Harlin Shackelford 

   James Joseph Carlisle Shackelford was born in Lowndesville, South Carolina October 31, 1826. He married in Troup County, Georgia February 06, 1849 to Margaret A. Forbes. She was born in Georgia, County unknown March 25, 1827 and died in Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia June 06, 1909. James died in Carrollton June 25, 1915. They are buried at the Carrollton Cemetery in Carrollton.

   James was a Private in the 41st Infantry, Company I, in the Confederate Army, where his fellow servicemen knew him by the name of "Joseph Shackelford". He fought at the Battle of Nashville where he was captured by the Union Army December 14, 1864. He was held as prisoner of war at the infamous Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois until his release on June 20, 1865, at which time he returned home to his family in Carrollton. 

The Parents of Seabron Washington Millican 

   Thomas Millican, Jr., was born possibly in North Carolina November 05, 1808. He married in DeKalb County, Georgia during 1834 to Louisa Wiles Ward. She was born possibly in Georgia estimated before 1817 and died in Carroll County, Georgia, date unknown. Thomas died in Carroll County March 18, 1871. They are buried at the Old Concord Cemetery in Carroll County. 

The Parents of William (Billy) Godbee 

   Stephen A. Godbee was born in Burke County, Georgia February 05, 1829. He married in Burke County before 1855 to Jincy West. She was born in Burke County estimated at about 1833 and died, date unknown, in College Park, Fulton County, Georgia. Stephen died in College Park during 1865. They are buried at the Godbee Family Cemetery in College Park.

 

 


      James Carlisle Shackelford
By: Donnie Shackleford 

   James Carlisle Shackelford was the first son of Howard B. and Margaret Carlisle-Shackelford and a great grandson of John and Anne White-Shackelford of Shelby County, Kentucky. James was born October 31, 1826 in the Lowndesville area near Abbeville, SC. Howard's father was Mordecai who lived a few miles west of Lowndesville, SC. However, Howard was living in the nearby village of Abbeville, South Carolina at the time of the 1840 census, and is the most likely place of the birth of James. Across the Savannah River in the Georgia County of Elbert was the family of John McEver Forbes, born November 13, 1800 and died August 01, 1895 in Carrollton, Georgia at the age of 94 years. John McEver Forbes married two times; first to Azubah McNeas from Jackson County, Georgia on March 02, 1826 and died 1844 in Calhoun County, Alabama. John's second marriage was to Ann Davis who was born 1796 and died June 17, 1874. On March 25, 1827 John McEver and Azubah McNeas-Forbes gave birth to Margaret "Margie" A. Forbes. On February 06, 1849 in the Georgia County of Troup, Margaret A. Forbes became the wife of James Carlisle Shackelford. 

   At the time of the marriage of James and Margaret Shackelford, James Shackelford's family was living in Meriwether County, Georgia and the family of Margaret's was living across the county line in Troup County, Georgia. John McEver Forbes had been awarded land grants from the Cherokee Lotteries on May 29, 1843, a claim for lot # 574-3-3 in Troup County. Also living in Meriwether County were members of the family of William and Mary Shackelford-Grant, the Aunt and Uncle of James Carlisle Shackelford. William's father, John Grant, passed away in 1820 and by 1830, his wife Isabella Grant along with William and Mary Grant and some members of the Carlisle family had also moved to Meriwether County. Soon after 1850, James and Margaret were living in Pike County, Georgia. Sometime before the 1860 census was taken, James Carlisle and Margaret Forbes-Shackelford had once again moved, this time to Carroll County, Georgia where many of their descendants live to this day. 

   Their first child, James Carlisle Shackelford, JR., died in March, 1850 and was buried at the Bonner Cemetery on Gold Mine Hill in Carroll County. The year of 1850 was also the same year of the death of James Shackelford's mother, Margaret Carlisle-Shackelford and also the last known year of any records of his father Howard B. Shackelford.  By the end of 1860, Margaret Forbes-Shackelford had given birth to their other four children, Mary, John Harlin, William Alexander and Laura Lavonia, all born in Pike County, Georgia. By the time of the 1870 census, John McEver Forbes and his second wife Ann had moved just two houses away from James and Margaret  in Carroll County where he remained until his death in 1895. He and his wife Ann are buried next to the grave of the infant son of James and Margaret Shackelford. 

   At the time of the 1860 census, James had the occupation as farmer but by the time of the 1870 census his occupation had changed from a farmer to that of a tanner. This is most likely a trade he developed as a Private in the 41st Infantry, Company I, in the Confederate Army, where his fellow servicemen knew him by the name of "Joseph Shackelford". According to some family members during the  days of the Civil War, the farm of James also served the purpose of making boots for the Confederate Army. Family folklore has it that during the time the Union troops were moving through Carroll County, his family was busy at their trade in the tannery business. James was also a member of the Free-Masons and knowing that the Union Officers had a great deal of respect for this organization, he had instructed that the emblem of the Free-Masons be placed at the entrance to his farm. As the Union Troops passed through they saw the emblem which had been placed at the farm's entrance and out of the respect that James had believed they would show, by-passed his farm, never knowing that he was operating a boot factory for the Confederate Army. 

   The above story may or may not be true, as mentioned; it is only family folklore. But what is not folklore is the historical fact that James Carlisle Shackelford did indeed serve in the Confederate Army. He enlisted on March 04, 1862 in Heard County, Georgia as Private Joseph Shackelford and served in Company 1 of the Georgia 41st Infantry, Stovall's Brigade, under the command of Brig. General Marcellus A. Stovall. This unit, as well as several others, was placed under the command of Major General Carter L. Stevenson, Stevenson's Division. This Brigade was involved in several campaigns, including the Atlanta and Tennessee Valley Campaigns. Stovall's Brigade fought at the Battle of Franklin and moved on to the Battle of Nashville where the Union Army captured Private James (Joseph) Carlisle Shackelford on December 14, 1864. He was held as prisoner of war at the infamous Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois until his release on June 20, 1865, at which time he returned home to his family in Carrollton, Georgia. 

   During the Atlanta Campaign, General Stevenson's Division came under the Command  of General John Bell Hood, the previous commander being General Joseph Johnston. Johnston seemed to put more emphasis on the loss of real estate and less emphasis on the loss of his men, believing that real estate could be retaken and that a soldiers life could not. General Hood had the reverse idea, putting the loss of his men of less of importance than the real estate. His battle plans were to attack and keep attacking regardless of the cost of life. Even with this errant disregard of the life of a soldier, Jefferson Davis as Commander of the Army of Tennessee appointed General Hood on July 17, 1864. This move would eventually prove to be a disaster for the Confederate Army. At the Battle of Kolb's Farm near Kennesaw the Confederate losses were in excess of 1,000 men, with Stevenson's Division, the Division that Pvt. Shackelford was a member of, losing 870 men. In the words of General Johnston concerning General Hood and the Battle of Kolb's Farm, "Hood had his moment of glory and reclaimed his reputation as an aggressive commander, but at a cost the Confederacy could ill afford." 

   After the stinging loss that came from the fall of Atlanta, General Hood moved his men north to the Battle of Allatoona Pass. The mission of re-capturing Allatoona Pass fell upon General Samuel French who referred to it as "a needless effusion of blood." At the loss of many men, the repeated assaults by the Rebel forces proved fruitless. From here, General Hood headed north into Tennessee, while General Sherman headed south. Unfortunately for the men under the command of General Hood, Sherman had left more than enough forces behind. General Hood's men first met the Union forces at Franklin on the way to Nashville on November 30, 1864. The ensuing battle at Franklin amassed a total of over 6,300 casualties for the Confederate Army. In a last desperate attempt to force General Sherman's army out of Georgia and after suffering terrible losses at Franklin, General Hood continued on toward Nashville. After suffering thousands of more casualties, General Hood and the Confederate army was decimated and ceased to exist as a fighting unit. General Hood retreated to Tupelo, Mississippi while many of his men, including Private James (Joseph) Carlisle Shackelford, were taken prisoner. Private Shackelford would serve out the remainder of the war at Camp Douglas in Chicago, Illinois. 

   From February 30, 1862 to July 05, 1865, Camp Douglas hosted many thousands of Confederate prisoners of war in what had become known as the "North's Andersonville." By the end of the war, 4,275 confederates died, many from starvation, others froze to death being deprived of the necessary blankets to keep them  warm. Their deaths and suffering were the shame of a vengeful Union. The sacrifice that these men endured has been largely forgotten, being only remembered by one monument erected by Southern veterans at Oak Wood Cemetery. Private James Shackelford was released on June 20, 1865, only two weeks before the camp was closed, at which time he returned to his wife Margaret and their four children in Carrollton, Georgia. 

   By the end of the civil war, thousands of Confederate prisoners who died while imprisoned at Camp Douglas and were buried in the North Side Cemetery. Upon closing of the cemetery, many thousands were moved to Oak Woods.One section of Oak Woods is known as the "Confederate Mound". A 46-foot monument stands alone, surrounded by cannon and cannonballs. Buried around it are an estimated six thousand soldiers and sailors of the Confederacy. The 46-foot monument was dedicated on Memorial Day, May 30, 1895. The Confederate Mound at Oak Woods is the largest Confederate burial ground in all the North. 

   Margaret Forbes-Shackelford died at the age of  83 June 06, 1909 and James Carlisle Shackelford lived for another six years, passing away at the age of  88 on June 25, 1915. They are both buried at the Carrollton Cemetery in Carrollton, Georgia. Joseph Knox Griffin, the son-in-law of James and husband to his first daughter Mary E. Shackelford-Griffin , signed the Petition For Letters of Administration, State of Georgia, Carroll County on the estate of James Carlisle Shackelford on July 03, 1915 and was granted the right of administrator on August 02, 1915. Within the past few years a tombstone has been placed in between the graves of Margaret and James with the inscription; Pvt. Joseph Shackelford, 41st GA. Inf., b: 10-31-1826; d: 06-25-1915. 

   All of the children of James Carlisle and Margaret Forbes-Shackelford's children except for their first child were born in Pike County, Georgia. The mystery of what became of his father, Howard remains unknown. From the information I have found on the siblings of Howard, his brother Allen was living in Pike County at this time, which gives reason why James first moved to Pike County after his marriage to Margaret. 

   The following two documents concerning the estate of James Carlisle Shackelford were petitioned by Joseph Knox Griffin, husband of Mary Elizabeth Shackelford, daughter of James Carlisle Shackelford. 

Petetion for Letters of Administration
STATE OF GEORGIA, CARROLL COUNTY 

To the Ordinary of said count: 

The petition of J.K. Griffin respectfully showeth that J.C. Shackelford, resident of said county, departed this life on the 25th day of June, 1915, leaving your petitioner (has been selected as admin of said estate by the nearest of kin), and also leaving a large estate and personal property, worth the sum of $5,000.00, and at the time of his death, the said J.C. Shackelford was entirely intestate, as your petitioner believes, and herein allege: Wherefore, he prays the usual citation in such case to issue, in order that he may obtain permanent Letters of Administration on J.C. Shackelford's estate, and your petitioner will ever pray. 

Petetion for Letters of Administration

STATE OF GEORGIA, CARROLL COUNTY 

To all whom it may concern: 

Joseph Knox Griffin having, in proper form, applied to me for permanent Letters of Administration, on the estate of James Carlisle Shackelford, late of said county, this is to site all and singular the creditors and next of kin of James Carlisle Shackelford, to be an appear at my office within the time allowed by law, and show cause, if any they can, why Permanent Administration should not be granted to Joseph Knox Griffin on James Carlisle Shackelford's estate. 

Witness my hand and official signature, this 5th day of July, 1915:

W.J. Millican, Ordinary 

Signed: Joseph Knox Griffin: July 03, 1915:

Carroll County Ordinary: W.J. Millican

 

1870 Federal Census, Carroll County, Georgia 

   James Carlisle Shackelford, his wife Margaret and two children are listed in the 1870 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia. James is listed as 43 years of age, farmer and was born in South Carolina. Both parents are listed as being born in South Carolina. Margaret is listed as 43 years of age born in Georgia and her parents are also listed as being born in Georgia.. There are three children listed in the household, John age 16; William age 13 and Laura age 8, all born in Georgia. 

1880 Federal Census, Carroll County, Georgia District 713

   James Carlisle Shackelford, his wife Margaret and two children are listed in the 1880 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia. James is listed as 52 years of age, farmer and was born in South Carolina. Both parents are listed as being born in South Carolina. Margaret is listed as 51 years of age born in Georgia and her parents are also listed as being born in Georgia.. The two children listed in the household are their two youngest, William age 23 and Laura age 18, both born in Georgia. 

1910 Federal Census, Carroll County, Georgia Township of Carrollton, page 114B 

   James Carlisle Shackelford is listed in the 1910 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia and are living in the Township of Carrollton. His wife Margaret died in 1909 and in 1910 he was living in the home with his daughter and son-in-law, Joseph Knox and Mary E. Griffin. James is listed as "J. C. Shackelford" age 84, born in South Carolina. Joseph Knox Griffin is listed as 60 years of age and was born in Georgia. His wife "Mary E" is listed as 58 years of age, also born in Georgia.
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File contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by: Don Bankston  July 24, 2004, 10:20 pm

BYRON, J. LEE, DR......Middle Ga. Argus - December 1894 Dr. Byron is a native Georgian. He was born in Coweta county just before the war between the states.  His parents moved to Carroll county and settled on a
farm near Carrolton, where his mother still lives.  After acquiring a liberal education he commenced teaching within two hundred yards of the old school house where he first entered school, teaching many children of parents with whom he had been a student in his early boyhood.  After teaching there three years he went to visit his sister who lived in Arkansas, and taught there for two years.  When he returned to Georgia he went into the drug store of his brother-in-law, Dr. J. C. Brown, at Whitesburg, now of Carrolton, and studied
pharmacy and medicine four years.  He then entered the Atlanta Medical College in 1885, from which he graduated March 4th,1887, and came to Jackson in April following.  By his unwavering and close application to business he has made an enviable reputation.  He is industrious, painstaking, ambitious and admirable
equipped in professional learning.  Though modest and unassuming, he is active and untiring, ever anxious to learn whatever will be conductive to the  furtherance of his profession, do credit to his calling and benefit suffering humanity.  The doctor is so congenial and pleasant that the sick feel better in
his presence, and his very successful practice has so inspired confidence in his ability, until people would really be surprised to ear of one of his patients dying, which they never do when their sickness is caused from anything
a full knowledge of medicine well applied to the case can remove.

The following life insurance companies for all of which he is medical examiner, hold him in high esteem: Washington Life, New York; Manhattan, New York; Mutual Benefit, Newark, N. J.; Massachusetts Benefit, Boston; Fidelity Mutual, Philadelphia; Neverland(?) Life, Amsterdam, Holland.

Elsewhere we give a fair representation of his residence on Main street, but
the picture of himself does not do him full justice.  Jackson and Butts county
are proud of all such men as Dr. J. Lee Byron.


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Z. T. ADAMS, farmer, Temple, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Absolom and Elizabeth (Reid) Adams, was born in Carroll county in 1845. His grandparents, Adams, were Virginian and moved thence to Tennessee, whence they subsequently came to Carroll county, where they died. -- Mr. Adams' father came from Tennessee to Georgia and settled in Carroll county in 1829, where he cleared a farm. He was a soldier in the Indian war of 1838. His great-grandfather on his mother's side, Reid, was a soldier in the war of 1812, during which he was shot in the stomach, the ball passing through the body. A silk handkerchief was drawn through the orifice afterward, and he recovered and lived many years. (TRANSCRIBERS NOTE: This same incident is repeated in the biography for Mr. Moses J. Baxter as having happened to Mr. Baxter.(??)

His maternal grandparents, Reid, were early settlers in this part of the state. Mr. Adams was reared on the farm and received a common country school education. Being too young to enter the Confederate service he enlisted, in 1863, in Company F (Capt Long), Georgia regiment, state troop:;. Mr. Adams was' married in 1864 . to Miss Rebecca C. Coleman, daughter of W. A. and Sarah Ann (Barnes) Coleman, old settlers of this part of the state. When he was married he had nothing-was. very poor: He has always been a plain farmer; has now a nice improved farm of nearly 200 acres with a comfortable house on it, within the corporate limits of Temple... Mr. and Mrs. Adams have had six .children born to them: William M. born Nov. 14., 1865; Henry T., born Jan. 16, 1868, a teacher in Texas; David N., born July 11, 1869; Gilbert E., born Oct. 30, 1872; Z. T, born Nov. 22, 1876; and Bessie, born Feb. 10, 1884- Himself and wife are devoted and. exemplary members of the Missionary Baptist church.


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G.R. ADAMSON, merchant, Bowdon, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John W. and Mary Ann (McDaniel) Adamson, was born in Henry county, Ga., in 1842. His, paternal grandparents were William C. and Elizabeth (Crawley) Adamson. He-was Born in Wilkes county, Ga., and she was a. native of Morgan, where they married. Mr. Adamson's father was born in Morgan county, in 1822, where he was reared and educated. About the time he reached his majority he went to Henry county, settled in the woods and cleared a farm. In 1852 he loaded his ox:

carts and moved to Carroll county, and again settled in the woods and cleared another farm. A few years after this he went over into Chambers county, Ala., settled in the woods and cleared a third farm. But he liked Georgia too well to be. satisfied, so he returned to Carroll county, and for the fourth time settled in the woods and cleared a farm-the subject of this sketch helping him in all, particularly the last three. In 1860 he began the mercantile business in Bowdon, but the war coming on the business collapsed, and everything was lost. In 1862 his father enlisted in Capt. Este's company, Twenty-sixth Georgia battalion; served through the war-and was at Columbus about the time of the surrender, but escaped being captured. After the war he went into business again at Bowdon, and continued it until he died in 1888.

In 1861 Mr. Adamson enlisted in Company B (Capt. Charles A. McDaniel), Cobb's legion, infantry. Capt. McDaniel was president of the college at Bowdon, and his company was mostly composed of his pupils, of whom Mr. Adamson was one. He was an active participant in many battles, among them -Dam No. I, Yorktown, Malvern hill, and South mountain, where he was severely wounded and captured, but was released. As a result of this wound he was disabled, but as soon as he recovered he returned to the army, in Tennessee. Thence he went to Virginia and was at the battle of the 'Wilderness. While his command was on duty on James river he was released on account of his old wound and returned home. While at Bowdon he was captured a second time, but it happened to be after the surrender. The close of the war left him comparatively destitute. Thus father and son, by their bravery and long continued faithful service, made a record of which they rightly felt proud. After the war he engaged with his father in business; but when he married, he went to another point, where he remained until his father's death, in 1888, when he returned in 1889 to Bowdon, took charge of and continued his father's business, and is-now-a leading merchant there.

Everything, immediate family connections, natural and by marriage, war record, and splendid business capacity, contributed to this result. Mr. Adamson was married in 1868 to Miss Fannie M. Yarbrough-born in Floyd county, Ga., in 185I-daughter of Nathan and Margaret (Lampkin) Yarbrough. Her father was born and reared in Franklin county, Ga., and went to DeKalb county in 1830 and clerked in a store in Decatur. In 1835 he went to Floyd county, and was one of the pioneers, if not one of the founders, and wrote the first charter of the now flourishing city of Rome. Years afterward he migrated to Texas, and is now living-85 years of age-in Comanche county. To Mr. and Mrs. Adamson ten children have been born: Edith, John, Herbert, Ralph, Norma (dead), Claris, Mattie, Ethel, Robert and Nathan. Mr. Adamson is a master and royal arch Mason, and himself and wife are members of the Methodist Protestant church.


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MOSES J. BAXTER, farmer, Temple, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John and Elizabeth {Stripling ) Baxter,-was born in Monroe County, Georgia in 1828 His paternal grandparents were John and Nancy (Dowdy) Baxter. His grandfather was born in England, and came to this country after the revolutionary war. He settled first in Virginia, afterward moved to North Carolina, and finally came

all the way from North Carolina to Georgia in an ox cart, and settled in the woods in Monroe county-among its pioneers. He followed farming all his life. He was a soldier of the war of 1812, and during his service had a remarkable experience with a wound. The ball went entirely through his body, and a silk handkerchief was drawn through the orifice, yet he recovered and lived many years in excellent health afterward.(TRANSCRIBERS NOTE: This some incident is repeated in Mr. Z. T. Adams biography as have happened to Mr. Adams (??) Mr. Baxter's father was born in 1807,and came to Georgia when a small boy with his father, who came to Carroll county in 1828; the subject of this sketch was an infant at the time, and the unconscious subject of a thrilling incident. The trip had been made in ox-carts, and when they reached the Chattahoochee river a negro nurse insisted on taking the baby in her arms. When the boat reached the opposite bank, the steers became scared and backed, and the negro jumped overboard with our subject in her arms. When she arose to the surface his father caught and drew them out. His father was a soldier in the Indian war of 1836; and, also, was a member of the Methodist church. His maternal grandparents, John and Mary Stripling, were among the early settlers of Monroe county. Mr. Baxter was reared on the farm in Carroll county, and the very limited education he received was at the old time dirt floor log house, with its unsatisfactory accompaniments. In 1862 he enlisted in Company F, Cobb's legion, and went to the front. But he was soon token sick and was sent to Richmond; where he remained many months, and when he had apparently recovered he returned to the army. It was not long before he was again prostrated, and, this time, came home on a furlough: he was at home at the time of the surrender. Like thousands of others, the war left him stripped of everything; but like them, he went bravely to work, impaired in health as he was, to build up. By dint of hard work and close management he has a fine, large farm, well improved, with nice dwelling and substantial out buildings, half a mile from Temple; and commands the respect of all who know him. Mr. Baxter. was married in 1852 to : Miss Sarah J., daughter of James and Elizabeth (Baskin) Stripling, early settlers, by whom he has had eight children: William A., N. N., James D., Robert A., John M., Geo. Ann, Florence, Frances, and Martha. Mr. Baxter is a master Mason and himself and wife are members of the Methodist church.


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JAMES H. L. BENFORD, farmer, Victory, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John and Martha (Anders) Benford, was born in Twiggs county, Ga., in 1837. His paternal grandparents, George and Elizabeth Benford, were Virginians, and he was a soldier in the patriot army during the revolutionary war. His father was born in Virginia in 1818, came to Georgia when a young man and settled first in Bibb county; he afterward went to Twiggs county and settled in the woods and cleared a farm. He was a soldier in the Indian war of 1836, and was wounded in the arm. His maternal grandparents, Robin and Elizabeth Anders, were natives of Maryland, but migrated to Georgia, and were among the earliest settlers of Twiggs county. Mr. Benford was reared on the farm in Twiggs county and remained on it until he was eighteen years old, when he removed to Carroll county and settled in the woods on the tract whereon he now lives. There was not a stick amiss on the land, and he cleared the land for his farm by himself. There were four families moved together in ox carts, and all of them occupied an eighteen by eighteen log cabin together, cooking, etc., until they could build. He went to school only one week and was never taught anything but the alphabet.

In 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Cleburne's regiment, known as the "Pattison Rangers." He participated in quite a number of battles-Gatling's farm, Petersburg Columbia, etc., but was most of the time on scouting duty, and often on special courier service. For nearly a month, at one time, his command was chased by Gen. Kilpatrick, fighting nearly every day. He was captured once in Virginia, and when commanded to surrender his gun he threw it down and broke it, and then put his foot on his sober and broke that, too; he then told his captors to toke him if they wanted to. As they were taking him to their lines, after dark, dangerous as the attempt seemed, he succeeded in eluding their vigilance and escaped. For a long time he was a courier for Gen. Lee, whose pass he bore permitting him to go where and when he pleased at his discretion. At the time of the surrender he was scouting in the rear of the Union army. He came out of the war with nothing but his land, and when his father died had his family to care for, giving the children a fair education. He owns now 1,500 acres of good land, including a well-improved farm, ,and has the reputation among his neighbors of being one of the most progressive and one of the best farmers in Carroll county., He certainly ranks among the solidest and most substantial of the county's citizens. In 1865 Mr. Morris was married to Miss Fannie Morris, born in Meriwether county and daughter of William and Sarah (Ayers) Morris. Fifteen children have blessed this union, of whom thirteen are living: Henry, Price, Alice, Lity, Warren; Terrell, Eugenia, Perdue, Anna, Sula, Edell, Artentious, and Pious. Mr. Benford is a master Mason. and himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist church.


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GEORGE A. BONNER, farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Zadoc and Lucy (Ridgeway) Bonner, was born in Carroll county in 1844. His great-grandfather was a soldier in the patriot army during the revolutionary war. His grandparents, Zadoc and (Johnson) Bonner, were natives of Georgia, and his grandfather was born during the revolutionary war. Mr. Bonner's father was born in Clarke county, Ga., in 1804, and was reared there on a farm and removed to Carroll county in 1829. He was a man of great energy, progressive and aggressive, and possessed unusual force of character. During the Indian war he raised a company, but the war closed before he could be mustered in. Although the county was always overwhelmingly democratic and he was a whig in politics, he was, repeatedly elected a justice of the inferior court. When he moved: to Carroll county he settled in the woods, lived to accumulate a very large estate and to become-one of the county's most influential and honored citizens. His maternal grandparent, Drury -Ridgeway, was an old settler of Georgia, who subsequently went to Alabama. Mr. Bonner was reared on the farm and received his early education in the common schools of the county. He then entered Bowdon college, where he was when the civil war began. In 1862 he enlisted in Company D, Capt. William Tumlin, First Georgia regiment, and served about eighteen months, during which time he participated in many hard-fought battles, among them Richmond, Ky., Frankfort, Shelbyville, Camp Dick Robinson, Perryville, Crab Orchard, Murfreesboro, Stone Hill, Winchester; Tullahoma, Munfordville, etc. Returning home he was engaged in gathering saltpeter and lead for the Confederate government until the surrender, and then he returned to the old farm where he now lives. His last service was the bearing of a dispatch from Jacksonville, Ala., to La Grange, Ga. When he reached his destination he found LaGrange in the hands of the Union forces, but he was sharp enough to escape capture. He has been a jury commissioner for the last five years. Mr. Bonner was married in 1872 to Miss Mattie E., daughter of Green and Martha (Freeze) McGuire, of Irish-descent but among the early settlers: To Mr. and. Mrs. Bonner eight children have been born: Zadoc M., ala G., George L., Bessie B., Flora 1., Lona. Mc., Georgia and Ruth N. Mrs. Bonner. who was a devoted member of the Methodist church, died in 1893. Mr. Bonner has been a master Mason since he has become of. "full age" and is one of Carroll's public spirited and, progressive citizens. His family for generations have been among the most prominent and respected, but having been members of the minority, party before the War seldom held office. This family is related by blood to that so prominent in New York.


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S J. BROWN, ordinary of Carroll county, Carrollton, Ga., son of Samuel and Ruth T. (Brooks) Brown, was born in Newton county, Ga., in 1842. His grandfather, Burrell Brown, came to Georgia late in the last century and settled in the woods. Mr. Brown's father was born in Burke county, Ga., in 1800. After receiving his education he taught school a number of years himself, finally settling on some lands in the woods in Newton county, living alone and working hard to open a farm. In 1836 he married his wife, a daughter of Terrell Brooks, and reared a family of nine children. In 1854 he removed to Carroll county, where the future ordinary took his lessons in and enjoyed the beauties and facilities of pioneer life. Judge Brown was reared on the farm, and attended the common county schools. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B, Capt. Charles A. McDaniel, Cobb's legion, Gen. T. D. R. Cobb, and participated in many important battles; Dam-No. 1 on the Peninsula, in April; 1862; the retreat toward Richmond; in the seven days' fight, Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862; Chancellorsville, May 1, 1863, when he was wounded in making a charge on the enemy's breastworks, and returned home in June. Although disabled by the loss of the use of his arm, he determined to return to the army and to his company, and as he could do nothing else he carried water and waited on the sick and wounded, exhibiting a patriotic, self-sacrificing disposition very rare. After his return he participated in the battles of the Wilderness, Spottsylvania, Hanover Junction, Cold Harbor, Petersburg and several other battles, remaining in the field until July, 1864, when he was retired on account of disabilities. After the war he attended Bowdon College, remaining from 1867 until 1871, and then he taught school until 1875. In 1876 he was elected county school commissioner, and held the office eight years. From 1881 to 1884 he taught school again. In 1885, he was elected ordinary of the county, and has held the office continuously since. Judge Brown was married Jan. 10, 1871, to Miss Charlotte C., born in Lee county, Ala., a daughter of W. T. and Ann (Stringer) Colguitt, by whom he has had eight children: Ruth, Belle, Mary Lee, He1en, George c., Samuel D., Mattie and Lamar Judge Brown is a Primitive, and his wife a Missionary Baptist. He has made an upright, faithful officer, is esteemed by everybody, and will probably hold the office as long as he wants it.


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W F. BROWN, lawyer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of James C. and Emily M. (Knight) Brown, was born in Carroll county in 1850. His grandfather, John Brown, was born in South Carolina, whence he came to Georgia in ox-carts and, settled in the woods on land now included in DeKalb county. They lived in tents until they cut the logs to build their cabin, and they cleared the land for cropping. In 1832, ten years after DeKalb county was laid off, he removed to Carroll county, organized a year or two before, and again settled in the woods, practically repeating his experience in making the home he had left. Mr. Brown's father was born in what is now DeKalb county in 1815, and accompanied the family to its new home. His mother's parents, John C. and Emily (Hopkins) Knight, were among Carroll's early settlers. Mr. Brown was reared in Carroll county and received a good common school education. When nineteen years of age he began teaching school and continued it seven years, and also began reading law. In 1876 he entered the literary department the University of Georgia, and was graduated in 1878. He was admitted to the bar, and entered upon the practice of law in 1880, and has been eminently successful. He is recognized as being as well read in law as the majority of the profession practicing in his circuit, as one of its leading lawyers, and gains his share of the cases intrusted to his management. He has a good and growing clientele. No citizen stands higher or better in the estimation of the people than Mr. Brown. In 1884 he was elected to represent Carroll county in the general assembly and served the term. Mr. Brown was married in 1873 to Miss Emily, daughter Of Archey and Malinda (George) Hagon. The father was one of the early settlers in Coweta county, the mother was born in Jackson County, Ga. Of the eight children born to Mr. and Mrs. Brown these seven are living: EarlL, appointed to a cadetship at the West Point Militory academy, after passing a crucial competitive examination; Ralph S., Emily, Paul F., Willie G., Harry D., and Eveline. Mr. Brown is a member of the I. O. O. F., and in masonry a royal and select master. Himself and wife are working members of the Methodist church-he being superintendent of the Sunday school. He is also one of the trustees of the Hutcheson Collegiate institute. He is now judge of Carroll City court under appointment of Ex-Gov. Northen. Altogether Mr. Brown is a thoroughgoing, progressive and most worthy citizen.


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0 D. BUNT farmer and merchant, Bowdon, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John R. and Frances J. (Morris) Bunt, was born in De Kalb county, Ga., in 1857. His paternal grandfather, Thomas Bunt, was a native of South Carolina, and came to Georgia early in this century. He was a soldier during the revolutionary war. Mr. Bunt's father was born in South Carolina in 1825, and came to Georgia with

his parents when a child. In 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Potts' company for two years, and in 1863 re-enlisted and served until the surrender. He had acquired a large property before the war, but lost it all; and when he returned from the army he had to make a new start. His maternal grandparents, Obadiah and Sarah (Binion) Morris; were native Georgians. Mr. Bunt was reared on a farm, and as the war was raging, and school facilities were limited, during his boyhood he was favored with but limited schooling. But he had capacity, and with it ambition and pluck, and so he pressed forward in the race of life. Without money, but with the qualities mentioned, he is fairly on the road to wealth and position. He now owns a 350-acre farm of fine land, and has supplemented his farm with a general merchandise store, building up a good trade and largely increasing his income. Mr. Bunt was married in 1884 to Miss Nora P., daughter of L. J. and Ada J. (Hood) Aderhold, all born in Carroll county. Her father was a son of G. W. Aderhold, who was born in 1843, and served gallantly in the Confederate army under Gen. Bragg, and was a physician of some note. Three children have blessed this union: Ethel, Leola and Hettie. Mr. and Mrs. Bunt are members of the Methodist church, with cheering prospects of a prosperous and happy future.


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JAMES W. BURNS, farmer, Bowdon, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Samuel and Jane (Morris) Burns, was born in Florida, Dec. 19, 1838. His grandfather on his father's side, James Burns, came from Ireland to the United States early in this century, settled in North Carolina, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. He was a near relative of the poet, Robert Burns. In 1835 he came to Georgia and settled and cleared a farm in Henry county. Some years subsequently he removed to Carroll county and settled. Mr. Burns' father was born in Ireland in 1804, came to this country with his father, and with the family from North Carolina to Georgia. His grandparents an his mother's side, William and Hannah Morris, were natives Of Virginia, whence they came to Georgia and made their home in DeKalb county, being among the county's pioneer settlers. Mr. Burns was reared on the farm, received only the limited education obtainable between "laying by" and "fodder-pulling" time at the old-time school house two and a half miles away. In early manhood he taught school two years. In 1861 he enlisted in Company E (Capt. James Blalock), First Georgia cavalry; for a while he was with Gen. Forrest, and afterward with Gen. Wheeler. To have been with either of those generals means that he sow as much continuous hard service and bore a part in as much hard fighting as anyone during the war. He was engaged in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and Franklin, and was with Johnston and Hood all the way to Atlanta; and under Wheeler made the raid all the way to Nashville, and was with the forces that harassed Sherman when "marching through Georgia;" while in the service he was sergeant of his company. After the war he returned to Georgia. Mr. Burns was married in 1865 to Miss Elizabeth F. Moore -born in Henry county daughter of Harrison Moore, a native of Georgia, who removed from Henry to Carroll county, and. who, though starting poor, lived to become rich. To the happiness of this household eleven children were added, nine of whom are living: Sarah J., Lula; James M., Beulah, Benjamin L., Samuel H., Ed, Katie and Joseph. After his marriage he began life without a dollar, but by hard work, economy and good management he has accumulated a fine property, including 1000 acres of excellent land, with an improved farm and a delightful home in Bowdon. He is solid, substantial, popular. Mrs. Burns is a member of the Missionary Baptist church.


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WILLIAM B. CANDLER, merchant, Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Samuel C. and Martha (Beall) Candler, was born in Carroll county in 1847. An ancestor of the family, which is one among the most distinguished in Georgia at this time, was an officer in Cromwell's army. Mr. Candler's great-grandfather, William C. Candler, came from Ireland to America before the revolutionary war and was an officer in the patriot army. His paternal grandparents, Daniel and Sarah (Slaughter) Candler, were native Georgians. Mr. Candler's father was born in Upson county, Ga., in 1809, and removed to Carroll county in 1832, where he began life by working in the gold mines at $6 a month. His life success affords another and striking illustration of the opportunities this country affords for acquiring fortunes and achieving distinction. He served as a justice of the inferior court of the county a number of years; he represented the county in the general assembly-once as senator and twice as representative and was in Charleston in 1860 at the democratic presidential convention. He was one of eleven children, all of whom are living but one; he was a "live" member of the Masonic fraternity, and at the age of sixty joined the Methodist church. From a poorly-paid workingman he rose to wealth and honor and lived to a ripe old age. Mr. Candler's maternal grandparents, Noble and Justain (Hooper) Beall, were of Scotch descent and early settlers in Georgia. Mr. Candler was reared on the farm within a mile of where he now lives, and attended school at the "regulation" log school house. But, as during his youth hood war raged the fiercest, and there was the direst necessity for field labor, his educational advantages were seriously curtailed. After the war ended he taught school six months and after that (1868) embarked in the mercantile business, in which he has been exceptionally successful. In 1871 Mr. Candler was married to Miss Lizzie Slaughter born In Carroll county, daughter Dr. J. T. and Melvina (Freeman}Slaughter. Dr. Slaughter was a leading and one of the most prominent physicians in the state. Four children blessed this happy union: Eugene, Florence, Lizzie and William B. Mr. Candler and two of the children are members of the Presbyterian church, and Mrs. Candler and the other two children are members of the Methodist church. Mr. Candler rates high in the commercial world as a man of practical business and financial ability, while in social life himself and family are outranked by none.


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W A. COLEMAN, farmer and banker, Carrollton, Carroll Ca., Ga., son of Henry A. and Sarah Ann (Barnes) Coleman, was born in 1838. His paternal grandparent, George Coleman, was a native Of South Carolina, and came from that state to Georgia early in this century. His father was born in Putnam county, Ga., in 1814, was reared a farmer, and was a soldier in the Indian war of 1836. Far many years he was bailiff, and also a major of militia in Cobb county, Ga., when to be a major was something of a distinction locally. He was a. prominent member of the Missionary Baptist church. His maternal grandparents, James and Sarah (McKenzie) Barnes, were among the early settlers of Lincoln, county, Ga. Mr. Coleman was reared an a farm in DeKalb county, and what little education he received was at the 'Old-time lag school so many times described elsewhere in this volume, and in obtaining it had to go three or four miles barefooted. In October, 1861, he enlisted in Company E (Capt. Sharpe), First Georgia cavalry, and continued in the service until April 26, 1865. He was in many hard-fought. battles, notably Chickamauga, Resoca, Kennesaw and Marietta all the way to Atlanta and Savannah. He was on the skirmish line when Stoneman surrendered, and although he was neither wounded nor captured during the war, he narrowly escaped both. A spirit of enterprise and adventure took him to Honduras, Central America, in 1868, when he carried with him the necessary machinery and implements to engage extensively in sow-milling, fruit growing and cane-culture. He sowed the first lumber ever sowed and baled the first cotton ever baled far shipment in that country. His extensive manufacturing, agriculture' and property interests in Honduras are now in charge of his son, William F. who resides there. From that source he derives a very large income, in addition to that from a large, well-improved farm in Carroll county, far, in addition to successfully managing enterprises so large and so remote, he prides himself on being- 'One of the best farmers in this county. His success in everything he has undertaken has been phenomenal. He changed his residence from his farm to Carrollton, where he has an elegant home, so as to educate his children. He is one of the directors of the Carrollton bank. Mr. Coleman was married in 1858 to Miss Cynthia Riggs-born in Butts county, Ga.-daughter of John and Jane (Florence) Riggs, early settlers. Mr. Riggs was born in South Carolina, ran away from home and came to Georgia when sixteen years of age, and afterward became a Baptist minister of note. This wife died in 1877, leaving one child, William F., now in Honduras. In January 1879, Mr. Coleman married Miss Clara, daughter of Valentine and Eliza. (Gant) Kolb, a family of wealth, and among the first settlers of Meriwether county, Ga.. by this marriage two children have been born to him-Laura and James. Mrs. Coleman is a member of the Missionary Baptist church and Mr. Coleman is a master Mason.


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HENRY F. CRAWFORD, farmer, Temple, Carroll Ca., Ga., son of Gallant and Katie Crawford,. was born in what is now Spalding county, in 1846. His Paternal grandfather. William Crawford, was a native Virginian, came to Gear_ in ax-carts in 1810, and settled in the woods. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. Crawford's father was born in what is now Henry county, in 1816, and was reared a farmer, and fallowed farming all his life. He was a soldier in the Indian war of 1836. His maternal grandparents were among the first settlers and wealthy citizens of that part of the state. Mr. Crawford was reared on the farm and had to work hard, and so had to be content with a very limited education. In 1864 he enlisted in Company F (Capt. Thomas), Phillip’s legion, and although his, service was not lengthy, it was rough and arduous., He participated in the Bellfield creek raid-three days' fighting-the battle of Petersburg; and the stirring events of the closing scenes of the war. He was in the engagement at Orangeburg, S. c., and Salisbury, N. C., and was at Charlotte, N. C., at the time of the surrender. After the war he came home and engaged in farming. In 1870, Mr. Crawford was married to Miss Nancy, daughter of John and Eliza (Weidner) Lee. Mr. Lee, her father, was born in Kentucky in 1818, and when seventeen years of age ran away from home and came to Georgia with some hog drivers, and never returned. Having fine business capacity, and being a shrewd trader he became very rich, but the war about ruined him. When Mr. Crawford married he was very poor, but not discouraged, and his wife proved a helpmeet, indeed; she worked with him in the field during the day, and at night spun and wove the cloth and made the clothing for the family. Thus they worked together and struggled on as plain farmers, until now he has a good 200-acre farm and comfortable home where he lives, and, nearby a 250-acre tract of choice land. To them six children have been born: Alice, wife of Cas Cantrell; Robert, Frank, William H., Rilla, and O. V. Mr. and Mrs. Crawford are members of the Missionary Baptist church, content with their success in life, and happy in the consciousness of having the confidence and esteem of their neighbors.


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ELISHA CREEL, farmer, Mandeville, Carroll Co., Ga., son of George and Harriet (Belcher) Creel, was born in Fayette county, Ga., in 1847. His maternal grandfather, William Belcher, was a Clayton county, Ga., pioneer and was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. Creel's father was born in what is now Monroe county, in 1816; but while yet a young man he removed to Fayette county, among its earliest settlers, settled in the woods and cleared a farm. From -this small beginning he has become by hard work and economy, and careful management, one of the wealthiest men in the county. Mr. Creel was reared on the farm and received but a limited education.

---In 1866, he married Mary Ann Miller-born in Campbell county-daughter of Jefferson and Eliza (Eidson) Miller, early settlers of Campbell county. Of thirteen children born to them these nine are living: George J., Joe, Wiley, Robert, Alice, Alvin, Hattie, Mary and Anna. Mr. Creel began life without a dollar and for some years had a very hard time. He moved to Carroll county in 1869 and in a few years began to prosper. He has now an excellent 750-acre farm, well improved, is recognized as one of the best farmers in the county, and is getting rich. He is another and a convincing example of what can be done in farming in Georgia when the farmer works intelligently, and works hard and early and late, saves a surplus and judiciously invests it. He commands the confidence and respect of all who know him. Mrs. Creel is a member of the Baptist church.


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JOHN F. CULPEPPER, SR., Whitesburg, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Joel and Elizabeth (Whitaker) Culpepper, was born in Coweta county, Ga., May 17, 1835. His paternal grandfather, Malachi Culpepper, was one of the early settlers of Morgan county, and was a soldier in the revolutionary war. His maternal grandparents;, John_and Polly Whitaker(nee-Holliway)were among the early settlers of Coweta county. His father was born in Morgan county, April 1, 1802, where he was reared, and lived until 1827, when he removed to Coweta county and settled in the woods. Mr. Culpepper was reared in Coweta county, and received a good common school education, earning the money himself that paid his school expenses one year. In 1855, he engaged as a clerk in a store in Carrollton, and after one year's experience "opened up" for himself, and continued in business until 1862, when he enlisted in Company B, Seventh regiment, Confederate cavalry (Capt. L.J. Smith). At the end of a year he hired a substitute, and entered into a contract with the secretary of war to gather material for the manufacture of ammunition for the armies, which contract continued until the surrender. After the war he entered mercantile life again in Newnan, Ga., and in 1877 lost everything, and went on the farm where he now lives. He made two starts in life, and failed to attain his end; but in his last undertaking, that of farming, he has succeeded beyond his most sanguine expectations, and rightly feels proud and exultant over his success. Mr. Culpepper was married in 1857 to Miss Epsie Boon -born in Carroll county -daughter of Jesse and Nancy (Lester) Boon, old settlers of the county. To them five children have been born -three living: Lucinda, wife of W.C. Branan; Anna, wife of T. E. Walten; and Vela. Mrs. Culpepper is a member of the Methodist church, and he is a royal arch Mason. Mr. Culpepper is a wide-awake, progressive farmer, and very much respected by all who know him.


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F M. FIEDLER, retired farmer, Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Terrell and Rebecca (Nolan) Fiedler, was born in Morgan county, Ga., in 1823. His great-grandparents, Jasper and Mary (Stewart) Fiedler, came from England to America before the revolutionary war, and settled in Virginia. Among the passengers aboard the some vessel was a Welsh family -named Stewart--husband and wife and little daughter. The parents died during the voyage, and the little girl was reared by a family named Fiedler. She afterward became the wife of James Fiedler and lived to be nearly 100 years old; 'Mr. Fiedler's grandparents, James and Sally (Benga) Fiedler, migrated from Virginia to Georgia and settled in the woods in Greene county, whence in a few years they removed to what is now Morgan county and cleared another farm, where they made a permanent home and remained- until they died-he in 1813 and she in 1830, aged seventy years. Mr. Fiedler's father was born in what is now, Morgan county in 1797; and was a soldier in the war of 1812. On reaching manhood he was ordained a minister of the Missionary Baptist church, and preached in Morgan and adjoining counties. Having drawn some land in Meriwether county for his services in the war of 1812, himself and his brother-in-law, Sam Harris, removed to Meriwether county, in 1833. They settled in the dense unbroken forest, in which Indians and wild animals roamed and prowled at will. His father organized a Baptist church -the first in that part of the state -in an old dilapidated log house, which had been built and used for a sheep pen. He afterward, in 1851, moved to Tallapoosa county, Ala., where he died in 1873, aged seventy-six years, peacefully closing a life faithfully spent in doing good and preaching the gospel. His maternal grandparents, George and Rebecca Nolan, were natives of South Carolina, who, coming to Georgia, settled near, Madison, Morgan county. Mr. Fiedler was mostly reared in Meriwether county, and had the benefit of but a few months schooling, and that was obtained at the old sheep pen where his father organized the church, after _a four mile walk, barefooted. He began life with nothing, and the first land he had he bought on credit, and before the war owned a 6oo acre farm and ten slaves. Farming has been the pursuit of his life; and, although not wealthy, he has a fine farm, amid a beautiful, comfortable home in Villa Rica. He served as notary public, ex-officio justice of the peace, two years. He was too old for regular service in the army; but served about six months in the Home guard. Mr. Fiedler was married in 1848 to Miss Martha Dobbs-born in South Carolina daughter of Silas, and Nancy (Myers) Dobbs, natives of South Carolina, who settled in Carroll county, in 1852. To them four children have been born, two of whom are living: Rebecca, wife of Dr. G. W. Strickland; and Silas 0. who married Florence, daughter of William Candler. Mr. Fiedler joined the church when seventeen years of age and has lived a consistent Christian life; and himself and his devoted companion are both members of the Missionary Baptist church.


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W. W. FITTS, physician and surgeon, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Walker and Ann P. (Christian) Fitts, was born in Elbert county, Ga., in 1830. His grandfather, Tandy Fitts, was born in Virginia, and was a soldier during the revolutionary war. His father was also born in Virginia, and came to Elbert county and settled in the woods in 1820. In 1829 he went to Monroe county, Ga., and again cleared a farm in the woods. His grandfather on his mother's side, William Christian, was born in Virginia, moved to Georgia, and was among Elbert’s early settlers. Mr. Fitts was reared in. Monroe county, and was educated in an old-time log schoolhouse with dirt floor, lighted through apertures cut in the logs, the seats being of slabs from the near-by sawmill, with holes bored in them in which to insert the legs. There he was instructed in the old blue-back Webster's speller, reading, writing, and in Smiley's arithmetic, by Prof. Newnan. In after years he attended a good school, taught. school himself and studied medicine. In 1856 he went to Atlanta, placed himself under the preceptorship of Drs. J. G. and W. F. Westmoreland, and entered Atlanta Medical College, where he graduated in 1860, and located in Calhoun county, Ala. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K (Capt. Ridley), Forty-fourth Alabama regiment (Col.Dent).

Before the command went to the army he was made surgeon. He remained in the service until 1863, when he resigned on account of sickness and returned home. Dr. Fitts was married in 1855 to Miss A. W. Brown-born in Newton county-daughter of Samuel and Ruth (Brooks) Brown, who has borne him six children: Emma, wife of C. B. Simonton; William L, M. D., a graduate of the Atlanta medical college, and eleven years in practice; Robert H., druggist; Anna, wife of R. N. Moses, postmaster, Carrollton, Ga.; Eugenia, wife of Frank Weens, of Rome, Ga., and James W., merchant. Dr. Fitts moved to Carrollton in 1863, took the lead there at once in his profession, has established a large and remunerative practice, and enjoys the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens. He has been a Mason since 1855, and is a member of the Council of Royal and Select Masters. He has filled all the offices below that of W. M. in thee blue lodge, and was a representative of the lodge many years. Himself and wife and family are members of the Baptist church.


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JUDSON T. FULLER, farmer, Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Alfred and Amanda (Evans) Fuller, was born in Meriwether county, Ga., in 1851. His paternal grandparent, William Fuller, was a native of South Carolina, and came to Georgia in 1828 and settled in the woods in Meriwether county. He was one of the pioneers, started on labor and pluck, and became one of the county's reading and wealthy citizens. Mr. Fuller's father was born in South Carolina" came to Georgia with his father, and helped to clear and then work the farm. His maternal grandparents, Elijah and Mary (Reed) Evans, were also natives of South Carolina, who came to Georgia about the time Meriwether county was laid out, and were among the early settlers in its woods. He was a tanner by trade and became rich. Mr. Fuller was reared on, the farm, and as he, passed. through youth during the war enjoyed quite limited educational advantages. In 1866 he came to Carroll county and began life by hiring out., By persistent, well directed effort, economy and good management he has acquired a fine property-400 acres of good land, including a large, well improved farm within five miles of Villa: Rica, and an elegant home in the little city, where he is living a contented life, happier than if he were a millionaire. Such men are the nation’s reliance in extreme emergencies. Mr. Fuller was married in I872 to Miss Mary E. Johnson-born in Walton county, Ga.-daughter of William and Elizabeth (Malcom) Johnson. This marriage has been blessed with seven children: Beulah, Lela, Maggie, Hardy, Thomas, Maude and De Witt. Mrs. Fuller is a consistent and devoted member of the Baptist church. It is almost needless to add that Mr. Fuller is one of the little city's most substantial and reliable citizens, and he . and his interesting family rank with the best.


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ALLEN M. GAY, farmer, Bowdon, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Gilbert and Sarah (Stamps) Gay, was born in Coweta county in 1831.,His paternal grandparents, Allen and Abrigail (Castleberry) Gay, were Virginians by birth, and he was a soldier in the patriot army during the revolutionary war. Some-years after that they migrated to Georgia and settled in Hancock county-bona fide pioneers. Here Mr. Gay's father was born in 1811. When he was thirteen years of age he went to Wilkinson county, Ga., whence a few years afterward he moved to Coweta county. In I848 he removed to Heard county and settled on Jumping Creek, where he ended his days. Mr. Gay's mother was a daughter of Moses and Ann (Eason) Stamps, who came to Georgia and settled in the woods in Jackson county in 1795. He cleared a farm and also did work as a gun and blacksmith. Leaving Jackson, he went to Gwinnett, and after two years went to Clarke county, where he staid two years, and then went back to Jackson county. From Jackson he went to Fayette, and lastly to Coweta county, where he died. June 29, 1894, Eson Stamps, Mr. Gay's uncle, his mother's brother, was one hundred years old, and he was given a birthday dinner-spread picnic style on the grass under the trees at Mr. Gay's home. There were about 500 people there, of whom he fed 300. The Grandfather Stamps was a soldier during the war of 1812, in the wars with the Indians, and was captain of a company in the Indian war of IS36. Mr. Gay was-reared a farmer, and was given such education as the schools afforded during his boyhood-taught as they were in log houses; with dirt floor and slab or split log seats. In IS51 he was married to Miss Martha Stamps-born in Jackson county in I622-daughter of Eson and Polly (Watts) Stamps, who has borne him five children, of whom only one, Sarah F., wife of Jeff Butler, is now living. When he married himself and wife had but one change of clothing, but now he has a well-improved 350-acre farm and is a well-to-do farmer. Himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist church and are much respected by all who know them.


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JAMES P.GRIFFIN, merchant, Temple, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Charles W.and Sarah (New) Griffin, was born in De Kalb county in 183S. His paternal, grandparent, James P. Griffin, was a native of South Carolina, came to Georgia in 1838, and settled in what is now De Kalb county. At that time they had to tramp their wheat out on the floor. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. Griffin's father was born in Abbeville district, S. C., in 1811; came to Georgia. With his parents when he was seven years old and was reared on the farm originally settled. He followed farming all his life, was a soldier in the Indian war 1836 and was a member of the Methodist church. His maternal grandparent, Joel New was a native of South Carolina and among the early settlers of De Kalb county. Mr. Griffin was reared on a farm in Carroll county, where he went with the family when he was eight years old. His father being a very poor man, and he the eldest boy of eleven children, had to work very hard, and was almost entirely deprived of the school advantages he yearned for.. Oftentimes, too, he had to plow through briar patches and his feet would get so badly torn he could hardly walk.

After he became of age he "boarded himself" and went to school. In l862 he enlisted in Company E (Capt. Blalock), First Georgia cavalry, and during the war was in many hard-fought battles, among them Richmond, Ky., Wheeler's Gap, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Resaca, and thence to Atlanta and on to Macon. At the time of surrender he was at Greensborough, N. C. He was in numerous minor engagements, and during his service had several horses shot from under him, but was so fortunate as to escape being wounded or captured. A part of the time he acted as orderly-sergeant. After the war Mr. Griffin worked a farm at fifty cents a day and taught school. Struggling on, working hard, and saving his money, he at last came into the ownership of a 500-acre farm of good land, well improved. In 1881 he engaged in a general merchandising business at Temple, where he has built up a good and profitable trade and has made and is making money. For six years he served as justice of the peace. Intelligent, industrious, and economical, in connection with energy and judicious enterprise, it may be expected his achieved success will be far exceeded by that of the future. Mr. Griffin was married in 1868 to Miss Sarah A. Adams-born and reared in Carroll county-daughter of Absolom and Elizabeth (Reid) Adams, by whom he has had seven children: Joseph, Ryburn, M. E., Bettie M., Lewis, Ella and Claudie. Mr. Griffin is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and himself and wife and all the children except the baby are members of the Methodist church.


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R L. GRIFFIN, farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Charles W. and  Sarah (New) Griffin, was born in De Kalb county, Ga., in 1848. His father was born in what is now De Kalb county in 1812, where he was reared a farmer, and moved to Carroll county in 1850. .He settled on a farm about eight miles from Carrollton. His mother was the daughter of John and Mary New. Mr. Griffin was reared mostly in Carroll county, a plain. farmer, and was educated at the "old field" school, taught in a log cabin. After reaching manhood he taught school about ten years and then engaged in farming. In 1887 he was elected tax collector and served two terms (four years) and discharged the duties of that office to the entire satisfaction of the people. In 1869 Mr. Griffin was married to Miss Georgia Holmes-born in Coweta county-daughter of Thomas and Mary Holmes; by whom he has had nine children: Charles M:, Mattie, Thomas, Percy, Herbert, Mary, Lee, Ellen and Barron. Starting with nothing, Mr. Griffin has now Has one of the best improved farms, containing 360 acres, in his locality, and is well thought of as a wide-awake, progressive farmer. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist church. .


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S. E. GROW, lawyer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Paschal P. and Elmyra (Wollcott) Grow, was born in Carroll county in 1851. The family is of English origin and among the early settlers of Vermont, in the person of John Grow, the great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch. His great-grandparents were Joseph and Tirszah (Sangor) Grow, and his grandparents were Samuel and Jerushia (Stowell) Grow. His great-grandfather and his grandfather were soldiers in the patriot army during the revolutionary war: His parents were school teachers, and migrated from Vermont to Georgia, and settled in the woods in Carroll county in 1836-bona fide "pioneers." In the early history of the county his father was one of its leading citizens. Three of his sons were in the Confederate army: Paschal P., who was in the battle of Manassas, died while in the service; Jacob C. now a Presbyterian minister in Llano, Tex., and Lewis K., who was killed in the charge at Petersburg. Mr. Grow's father died in 1861. Mr. Grow was reared in the county and received a good common school education. He began teaching in 1874, also read law and was admitted to the bar in Florida, May 10, 1875. Returning to Georgia, he was admitted to the bar in Carrollton, June I, 1875, and has been in the practice in Carrollton ever since, holding his own with his professional compeers. No one of the local bar outranks him, and he is held in the highest esteem professionally, politically and socially. A safe counselor, and an able and impressive advocate, he has secured a valuable clientele which is augmented every year. In 1882 he was mayor of Carrollton. He was chairman of the democratic fourth congressional committee in 1892, and for four years was chairman of the democratic executive committee of his county and has been re-elected for another term. In 1893 he was appointed clerk to the committee on pensions in the fifty-third congress. He has been a delegate to several, state conventions; but although he has always taken great interest in politics, he has never sought or been a candidate for office. Mr. Grow was married in 1877 to Miss Lenora, daughter of Col. Charles A. and Victoria A. (Hines) McDaniel. Her father was colonel of the Forty-first Georgia regiment, and was killed at the battle at Perryville, Ky. When the civil war began he was president of the college at Bowdon, Carroll Co. - a college and town which he founded and very many of his pupils went with him into the army. To Mr. and Mrs. Grow these children have been born: Samuel E., Dudley M., Victor D., Elmyra, Stephen and Helen. Mrs. Grow was born in Bowdon. Mr. Grow is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is a member of the council and a select master, of whichhe has been thrice illustrious master. He has also been worshipful master of his local lodge seven years. He is now district grand deputy. Himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian church. A record such as Mr. Grow's needs no comment-it speaks for itself with emphasis.


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ARTHUR D. HARMAN, a farmer, and engaged in milling and cotton ginning- business, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of William M. and Nancy (Dillard) Harman, was born in Monroe county, Ga., Nov. 14, 1832. His great-grandfather, Hezekiah Harman, emigrated from England to Virginia some years before the revolutionary war, and then moved to North Carolina. His grandparents, Merriman and Nellie (May) Harman, were born in North Carolina, migrated to Georgia in 1828, settled first in Monroe county, and then went among the first settlers to Meriwether county. There they lived the first year on a dirt floor, and as there was no sawmill near, he split out puncheon with which to lay a floor. Mr. Harman's father was born in Chatham county, N. C, in 1805, where he grew to manhood; then (1826) he came to Georgia and settled in the woods. In 1830 he was married to Nancy, daughter of Arthur and Mary (Abney) Dillard, who were born in South Carolina, and moved thence to Georgia and settled in Jones county in 1826. Both families for generations were farmers. To this union five children were born: Eliza J. Emeline E., Nancy A., Martha F. and Arthur D., the subject of this sketch, all of whom are now living except the eldest daughter. Mr. Harman was reared in Meriwether County and was schooled in the log cabin of that day and locality, with dirt floor, puncheon seats,. a chimney made of clay and sticks and square holes cut through the logs for windows. The only time he had for schooling was between "laying-by" and "fodder-pulling" time. Before the war he was captain of the militia, when the position had some local distinction, but in 1861 he enlisted as a private in Company A (Capt. J. D. Frederick), Tenth Georgia battalion (Maj. Rylander). He was on some of the most hotly contested fields -the Wilderness, Petersburg, Davis Farm, Blow Up, Deep Bottom, Turkey Ridge, Hatcher's Run, Suffolk, etc. After Suffolk he was transferred to Gen: Ranse Wright's brigade and remained with it until the surrender at Appomattox. For a considerable time during the war he acted as commissary, and in this position was faithful and prompt in the discharge of every duty. After the war he returned to his farm and has since engaged in farming. In 1892 he moved to Carrollton and invested in milling and cotton-ginning. Mr. Harman was married in 1857 to Miss Jane 1. Fincher-born in Troup county-daughter of Isaac and Elizabeth (Brooks) Fincher, who were among the early settlers of Meriwether county. To them eight children have been born: William 1., born March 26, 1859; Arthur D. born July 11, 1861; John A., born July 13, 1864; Betsy B., born February 15 1867; James R, born March 3, 1870; Luther M., born Jan. 26, 1872; Edgar S., born March 21, 1875, and Anna I., born Nov. 12, 1878. Mr. Harman is a royal arch Mason and himself and wife are members of- the Baptist church. He is a man in whom everybody has the utmost confidence and possesses no inconsiderable influence, and he and family are highly esteemed.


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SAMPSON W. HARRIS, judge of Coweta circuit, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Sampson W. and Paulina (Thomas) Harris, was born in Alabama, in 1838. His great-grandfather, Simpson Harris, was a native of Wales, and emigrated to Virginia before the revolutionary war. He came to Georgia in 1795 and settled in the woods. His grandparents were Stephen W. and Sarah (Watkins) Harris. His grandfather was one of the first graduates of the University of Georgia, Athens, Ga., was an eminent lawyer, and for many years a judge of the superior court. The father of the subject of this sketch was born in Elbert county, Ga., Feb. 23, 1809, graduating from the University of Georgia in 1828, and removed to Alabama in 1837, where he practiced law and rose rapidly professionally and politically. He represented the Fourth Congressional district of Alabama for ten years and died in Washington, while in congress, in April, 1857. Judge Harris was reared on the plantation, and received a good common school education. He entered the university of Georgia, in 1853, and graduated in 1857; studied law and was admitted to the bar in Oglethorpe county, Ga., and entered upon the practice. In 186r he enlisted in Company K (Capt. John T. Lofton) Sixth Georgia regiment, which was assigned to Gen. A. H. Colquitt's command. He served through the war, and was in many hard fought battles. He was seriously wounded and was captured by Sherman's army just before the surrender, but was paroled. He entered the army as first lieutenant, and was gradually promoted until he reached a colonelcy just before the close of the war. After the war he planted a few years, in Chambers county, Ala., and then resumed his law practice. He moved into Georgia in the seventies, and was a member of the constitutional convention of 1877. That some year. also, he was appointed solicitor-general of the Coweta circuit, which office he held until 1880, when he was elected judge of the circuit-a position he still holds. In May, 1894, Gov. Northen tendered him the office of secretary of state to fill a vacancy, but he declined the appointment. In 1866 Judge Harris was married in Alabama to Miss Lucy, daughter of Henry and_Emily (Watkins) Todd. This union has been blessed with six children: H. F., physician, graduate of Atlanta medical college, and of Jefferson medical college, Philadelphia, been in practice three years; Sampson; Stephen, graduate of Atlanta medical college; Isobella, Paulina, and Lucy. Judge Harris is a master Mason.


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HAMILTON HOGAN, farmer, Whitesburg, Carroll Co., Ga., son of James and Elizabeth (Spraggins) Hogan, was born in Pendleton district, South Carolina, March 1, 1820. His paternal grandparents, William and Nancy (Dillard)Hogan were Virginian born; and Mr. Hogan was a soldier in the revolutionary army. His maternal grandparent, Thomas Spraggins, was a native South Carolinian, and a soldier in the patriot army during the war for independence. In 1824, Mr. Hogan's father came from South Carolina to Georgia, settled in Habersham county, and rented a farm with a cabin on it preparatory to bringing his family. In 1825 he went for some needed articles, and to bring them he cut two poles to serve as shafts, and fastening the box containing his articles on one end, hitched his horse between the poles at the other end. He then put little five-year old Hamilton, the subject of this sketch, on his horse, and returned to Georgia, he walking all the way. This shows one of the methods by which the a "Empire State of the South" was peopled. In 1832 his father moved to Coweta county and cleared a farm on which he ended his days. Mr. Hogan attended school in the old-time schoolhouse, and after he "graduated" he taught school himself five years, by which he earned his first money. He next engaged in farming, which has been his life pursuit, in which he has been successful, and acquired a competency. In 1862, he enlisted in Company H, third Georgia battalion (Col. Stovall) and served one year, when his health failed and he was discharged. As soon as he recovered his health he re-enlisted, this time in Company H, of which he was made orderly sergeant, Sixty-sixth Georgia regiment (Col. Nesbit). He was captured at Decatur, Ala., and after being held some time was paroled. While at home the conflict terminated, and he is now the proud possessor of two one-hundred-dollar bills paid him for his services. Although he was not wounded-during his service in the army, the numerous perforations in his clothes show how narrowly he escaped not only wounds but death. He was in the battle of Missionary Ridge, and the charge on Peachtree creek, and many other engagements. In 1876 he was elected a representative from Carroll county to the general assembly, and was re-elected in 1878, but did not serve out the term. He is now serving his second year as county commissioner, and while serving as such he was largely instrumental in having erected the really elegant new courthouse, as good as any in the state, and, all things considered; one of the cheapest. Mr. Hogan was married in 1846 to Miss Jane Watson -born in Carroll county-daughter of Tyre and Clarissa (Sockwell) Watson -Georgia born- by whom he has had nine children: Helen, wife of J. T. Jones; Elizabeth, wife of L. J. Jones; Sarah J., wife of John A. Byers; Ellen M., wife of N. C. Morris; Fannie, James T. and Gus A., who are living; and Louisa J.,. wife of Henry G. Jennings; and Hepsie A., wife of John W. Duncan, deceased. Mr. Hogan is one of the most substantial and influential citizens of Carroll county, and is held in the highest esteem by everybody. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is a useful and exemplary member of the Methodist church.


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JOHN HOUSEWORTH, farmer, Whitesburg, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John J.and Catherine (Lyons) Houseworth, was born in Carroll county, in 1848. His grandparents on his father's side were Philip and Katie (Hollensworth) Houseworth. His grandfather's parents came from Germany to America before the revolutionary war, and his father dying when he was quite a child he was reared by a charitable institution in South Carolina. After reaching manhood and marrying he came to Georgia and settled first in Newton county, and afterward moved to De Kalb county. Here Mr. Houseworth's father was reared and married his wife, daughter of George and Kate Lyons, of English descent. Of ten children reared three sons enlisted in the Confederate army: Robert and Abraham, in Company K (Capt. Bark), Seventh Georgia regiment, which was in Early's command. Robert was a lieutenant, and he with his brother were in all the engagements in which his company bore a part, and was wounded at Knoxville, Tenn. Philip was in the western army under Capt. Kendrick. Mr. Houseworth was reared on the farm cleared by his father, and is living in the house in which he was born. He received a common school education, and started in life with a good constitution, good health, and a determined and willing spirit as his patrimony and capitol. Mr. Houseworth was married in Carroll county in 1869 to Miss Harriet A. Holland -born in the county -daughter of Linsey and Elizabeth (Lassetter) Holland. Ten children are the offspring of this union: Delvous, Wyley, Walter, Della, Frank and Lee (twins); Katie, Tiney, Anna, Gordon. Mr. Houseworth is a well-to-do prosperous farmer with more than 600 acres of productive land, doing well, and is highly respected.


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ARTHUR HUTCHESON, deceased, for years the president of the Hutcheson Manufacturing company, Banning, Carroll Co., Ga., was the son of James and Sophia (Montgomery) Hutcheson, and was a full-blooded Irishman, having been born in Ireland in 1818. His father died in 1827 and his mother in 1856. In 1836, when eighteen years of age, he left Ireland for America, on whose shores he landed after a journey of six weeks, and came to Campbell county, Ga., and stopped with an uncle living there. This uncle, James Hutcheson, left Ireland for this country in 1818, and his first stop in Georgia was in Milledgeville. From there he went to McDonough, Henry Co., and thence, in 1827, he removed to Newnan, Coweta Co. From Newnan he went, in 1832, and settled in the woods and cleared a farm, and here on this farm Arthur Hutcheson, without education or money, started in life. But he had good common sense, indulged in no bad habits, was frugal, and invested his earnings with rare good judgment. What he amassed was not made by sharp, tricky trading nor semi-gambling speculation. No "blood money" stained his purse. He did not accumulate rapidly, but he did it safely and surely, nor was he a millionaire, nor could he ever be, but he left a comfortable fortune, though he provided generously for himself and those dependent upon or serving him. During the war he was in the commissary department under Maj. Shackelford, whose headquarters were in Atlanta. He had a cousin in the army who saved the Confederate general, Bates, from being captured on one occasion when posting his pickets. After the war he engaged in merchandising at County Line, Carroll county, and in 1878 he bought an interest in what was then known as Amos' factory, to which he subsequently devoted almost his entire attention. At that time there was one mill, and that supplied with old-style, run-down machinery. The old fogy shareholders were gradually bought out, and under Mr. Hutcheson's able management improved modern machinery displaced the old. He next proceeded to organize a joint stock company with a capitol of $93,000, of which he was elected president and general manager. Additions and improvements were continued and now they have a 5,000-spindle (and preparation) cotton factory - a paper mill, two pulp mills, and a grist and sawmill, all fully equipped with the best made, modern improved machinery, all within a mile along the creek, propelled by water retained by one dam. This company operates one of the three mills in the United States that make striped paper. The company owns 1,300 acres of good land, employs 210 hands, and when all their machinery is running full time, 240. Workers are furnished house room and a garden spot free; and the, company has built a school house for the children and a church for them to worship in.. Mr. Hutcheson looked after the physical comfort of his employees and gave attention to their moral training and conduct. He was kind and considerate, and treated them humanely, respecting them himself and stimulating them to cultivate self-respect for themselves. It is superfluous to add that Mr. Hutcheson was esteemed very highly by all who knew him in financial circles as well as in the humbler walks of life. His true worth as a man could not be better appreciated than by his employees and their families, in whose welfare he took so much interest, and to them his death fell with the heaviest hand. He was a master Mason and an exemplary member of the Methodist church. He died on the morning of April 5, 1895.


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REV. W. W. KELLEY, Baptist minister, Whitesburg, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Andrew Wilson and Elizabeth J. (Pitts) Kelley, was born in Coweta county, Ga., in 1847. His paternal grandparents, John and Mary (Hews) Kelley, were natives of North Carolina, and came to Georgia about 1810. His grandfather was a soldier in the War of 1812. Mr. Kelley's father was born in North Carolina, came to Georgia with his father, and had a very fair education for his day. He was a member of the Baptist church and a man of considerable prominence in his day. His maternal grandparents, Archey and Charlotte (Burnett) Pitts, were South Carolinians, were Baptists, and early settlers of Georgia. Mr. Kelley was reared on a farm and received a good common-school education, and attended a theological school at Greenville, S. C. a part of one term in 1873. His father being a poor man, he earned the money himself to pay for his higher education. In 1863 he became his father's substitute in Company G, Second Georgia regiment, and served two months, when he was relieved. During this time he was sent to Grayville, Tenn., to engage in a battle, but it had been fought before he and his comrades reached the field. In 1864 he enlisted in Company I (Capt. J. Johnson), Bell's battalion, his' company performing guard duty most of the time. He began life after the war very poor, but feels that he has been wonderfully sustained and blessed by Providence. He was ordained a Baptist minister in 1871, but the first pastorate to which he was called was that of Whites­burg in 1874, since which time he has been actively engaged in the Master's service. He is now pastor of the churches of Central Hatchee, Heard Co.; Corinth (at Banning), and Salem, Carroll Co., and Effices, in Douglas county, Ga. He aided in the organization of the three last named, and also in the organization of Friendship, in Heard county, and Friendship and Ebenezer, in Douglas county. He was pastor of Friendship for fifteen months. In addition to this arduous work he taught school in 1874-75-76 and a part of 1877. During his ministry he had baptized about 1,000 persons and made scores of couples happy by uniting them in marriage. Rev. Mr. Kelley was married to Miss Elizabeth T., daughter of James D. Moore, a pioneer settler, in 1877, who has borne him five children, of whom three, James A., William B. and Charles 5., are living, and two, Carrie E. (Mrs. Van D. Sewell) and Thomas Mercer are dead. Rev. Mr. Kelley is a master Mason and Mrs. Kelley is a member of the Baptist church. He has a fine farm and comfortable residence in the edge of Whitesburg, is an exemplary Christian minister, and a useful and very highly esteemed citizen. To Andrew W. and Elizabeth Kelley ten children were born, eight sons-and two daughters. Of these W.W., Thomas A. James M. were ordained Baptist ministers, and actively engaged in the ministry. Andrew W. died in infancy and Newton Calvin at the age of eighteen. J. M. and Mary K. were twins. The latter married Mr. Capes, and the other sister, Amanda J., is the wife of W. M. Hunter.


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J R LASSETTER, general superintendent of the Hutcheson Manufacturing Company, Banning, Ga., son of William and Parthenia (Brown) Lassetter,was born in Carroll county. His grandfather, Benjamin Lassetter, came from Virginia to Georgia in 1828, and went to Milledgeville and bought the frac­tions of land in Carroll county on which he settled and began clearing for a farm that year. He was a soldier in the last war with Great Britain. His father, a farmer, was born in Carroll county, and was a member of the cavalry company commanded by Capt. Shuford three years during the late "unpleasantness." Mr. Lassetter received a good common-school education. His father died when he was young-, but being of the stuff that men are made of, he has persistently struggled toward the front, where, before many years, he will be. As soon as qualified he began teaching, and after following it a few years engaged in mer­chandising. Having the misfortune to be burned out, he went back to the old farm, which he bought-on credit; and after much privation and hard-struggling--­he paid for and began to lay up money. In 1891 he went to work for the Hutcheson Manufacturing Company, and in 1893 bought an interest in it. He has since been made general superintendent-a well-earned and deserved compliment to his pluck and energy and his superior general capabilities. He is a thorough­going young man, recognized as promising to become one of the most influential of his generation in the county. Little is known in Georgia of this Hutcheson Manufacturing company; on a small scale it is but a sample of many, in other localities in Georgia, of like topography and surroundings, and demonstrates the grand manufacturing possibilities of the state. . Mr. Lassetter richly deserves the confidence he has secured, and the success he has attained. With the position he holds in the company, the natural manufacturing advantages of the mills' site, the possibilities of greater development and expansion, and the advantages of the experience and instruction of the company's president, Arthur Hutcheson, this rising young manufacturer has before him a brilliant future.
 


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J. W. G. LASSETTER, farmer, Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Ga., son of William and Mary Parthenie (Brown) Lassetter, was born in Carroll county in 1858. His grandfather, Benjamin Lassetter, settled in Georgia early in the present century. Mr. Lassetter's father was Georgia-born, was reared a farmer, and came to Carroll county and settled on Snake Creek when it was a wilderness, in 1841. He cleared a farm and made a home there and reared a family of fourteen children, all of whom made good citizens. His maternal grandparents were also among the early settlers of upper Georgia. Mr. Lassetter was bred a farmer, received but little schooling, but enough to enable him to teach a short time. In 1883 he married Miss Mary Barnett, born in Georgia, daughter of Waddie H. and Nancy (Butler) Barnett, who were native South Carolinians, but came to Georgia many years ago. Two children, Erie and William c., have blessed this union. The first died in his youth. Mr. Lassetter began life with a horse and $200, has steadily pursued fanning as a business, and has succeeded admirably. He has a nice 250­acre farm, a comfortable dwelling and substantial outbuildings, and is a pro­gressive and prosperous farmer. Himself and wife are members of the Missionary_Baptist Church, and are exemplary farmers,  citizens and  church members.
 


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W D. LOVVORN, farmer and miller, Bowdon, Carroll Co., Ga., son of James and Bashaba (Traylor) Lovvorn, was born in Henry county, Ga., in 1831. His great-grandfather, "Elijah Lovvorn, came from Ireland to this country before the revolutionary war, and was a soldier in the patriot army, durii1g which time he suffered many privations and great hardships. His grandparents, James and Hannah (Smith) Lovvorn, were born in Virginia, whence they moved to North Carolina, and afterward to Georgia, about 1800, and settled in what is now Morgan county. Subsequently they moved to St. Clair county, Ala. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. Lovvorn's father was born in Morgan county in 1807 and went with his father to Alabama, where he died. His mother was a daughter of Mijman and Lidy (Lang) Traylor. Mr. Traylor was a soldier in the "War of 1812 and was captured and confined in Fort Pickens. He was fond of fun and jokes and on one occasion when sweeping the floor an officer passed him, and on the i11pulse of the moment he gave him a playful swipe with the broom. The officer resented the apparent indignity, and the incident came near involving him in serious trouble. He also served through the Indian war of 1836. Mr. Lovvorn was reared on the farm, in Alabama, and was educated in the common coutry schools (walking three miles, sometimes barefooted in the winter), taught in a dirt floor log house with split log seats. After "graduating" he taught school himself a few years. He was a justice of the peace many years, and in 1872 was elected to represent Randolph county in the legislature of Alabama-the last republican elected from the county. In 1878 he removed from Alabama to Carroll county, Ga., and bought and settled the large farming property on which he now lives, and on which he has built and runs a large custom mill. Mr. Lovvorn was married in Alabama in 1851 to Miss Sarah D. Burden -born in Elbert county, Ga.-daughter of Henry and Sarah (White) Burden. Her parents were born in Virginia, migrated to Georgia, and settled in what is now Hart county, and afterward moved to Alabama, where he died. Ten children blessed this union: Thomas J., Mary, Gaines W., William J., Sarah R., Robert M., Martha E., Cindonia and Henry O. Mr. Lovvorn and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist church. He was one of the first county commissioners of the county, a man of large property and a most substantial and highly-respected citizen.


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D. R. MARTIN, Farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John C. and Emily (Bates) Martin, was born in Coweta county, Ga., in 1846. His paternal grandparents migrated from South Carolina to Coweta county in 1830. They came in the old-time block-wheel ox carts, and it took them three weeks to make the journey. His grandfather was born in South Carolina and was a farmer, however, supplemented farming with blacksmithing and wood-working. Like other early settlers, he had to clear the land on which he made his home. His father was born in South Carolina in 1821, and his mother, daughter of David and Rhoda (Evans) Bates-old settlers-was born in Wilkes county, Ga., in 1824. Mr. Martin was reared in Coweta county, and, as were other boys at that time, was educated in an old-time dirt floor log cabin and subjected to all the inconveniences incident to them. In May, 1863, he enlisted in Company K (Capt. George Short), First Georgia regiment (Col. Lester), for six months; when the time expired he enlisted in the First Georgia cavalry (Capt. H. A. North, under Col. Cruse) and was in many battles. He was in front of Gen. Sherman's army from Marietta to Atlanta, and during the "March through Georgia." He was in North Carolina at the time of the surrender. Immediately after the event he returned to Carroll county penniless, but with a firm will and a stout heart went to work. In 1869 he bought a tract of land with not a stick amiss on it, and proceeded to make a farm and lay the foundation for a fortune. He made a specialty of raising Irish potatoes and fruit, and his great success has demonstrated his sagacity and wis­dom. In 1893 he bought the land on which he now lives, also virgin forest, which he has transferred into one of the best improved farms in this community, and has built on it one of the finest modern residences in the county. He is recog­nized as one of the leading and most successful farmers in Carroll county; rich and getting richer. In 1869 Mr. Martin was married to Miss Mary Ann, daughter of E.B. and Ruth Ann (Curtis) Martin, both born in Gwinnett county, Ga., who were among the early settlers of Carroll county, by whom he had the following children: Henry C, Lou, Ida, Mary and Claude. The mother of these children died in 1887, and in 1888 Mr. Martin married Nannie, widow of Thomas Dixon, and daughter of Otha and Eliza (Curtis) Bell, born in Randolph county, Ga. To them two children-Laura and Susie-have been born. Mr. Martin is a Knight of Honor, and himself and wife are members of the Methodist church. In farm management Mr. Martin is acknowledged to have few equals-no superiors. Con­tent with the superior management of his 240-acre farm, its profitable returns and the esteem of his neighbors, he is unambitious of public honors. Whatever he has is the result of honest toil.
 


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JAMES P.MOORE; capitalist, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John and Levisa (Petty) Moore, was born in Spartanburg district, S. C, in 1839. His paternal grandparents, Hugh and Elizabeth (Thomas) Moore, were natives of South Carolina. His grandfather was a soldier in the revolutionary war and his grandson -the subject of this sketch, is "a chip of the old block"-has the musket he "toted" all through that memorable struggle. His maternal grandfather, Charles Petty, was also a soldier in the patriot army. Mr. Moore was reared in South Carolina and received a limited education, and when a mere child had to walk three miles daily to obtain it. April 1, 1861, he enlisted in Company H (Capt. Joe Walker), Fifth South Carolina regiment (Col. Jenkins), which was assigned to the command of Gen. Beauregard. He served in this company nearly a year, when another company was formed known as the First Palmetto Sharp­shooters, which caused some changes, and in the reorganization of Company H { Mr. Moore was made captain, which he continued to be until the surrender. He was present at the firing on Fort Sumter. When it fell he went to Virginia, and beginning with First Manassas, participated in many of the bloodiest and most fiercely contested battles during the entire war-including every battle in which Jenkins' brigade was engaged. That he was in the foremost on every battlefield it is needless to say, for with a double strain of revolutionary blood in his veins, and South Carolina blood at that, nothing else could be expected. It has been stated above that he had in his possession the musket which his Grandfather Moore carried during the war for independence. The following incident will show why he should be doubly proud of it-first, its family and historic interest; second, the circumstances attending its retention. After the war, in pursuance of a military order, the union soldiers. proceeded to gather up all the arms in private hands in the south. When this old musket was demanded Mr. Moore refused to give it up, and when the soldiers attempted to take it by force he foiled them and made his escape with it. It is asserted that many a Federal soldier "bit the dust" in after attempts to capture him, and on roll call was reported "missing." Although he escaped capture, the continual danger he was in determined him to leave the state; so, in 1873, he came to Georgia and settled in Carroll county. He was a brick-mason, and worked at his trade, but he has done so well and managed and invested his gains so judiciously that he now ranks as one of the moneyed men of the county. In 1867 Mr. Moore was married to Miss Honora Elkin, daughter of Elbert and Mary Elkin. Mr. Moore stands well in Carroll county and is very much esteemed by all privileged with his intimate friendship.
 



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JAMES D. MOORE, farmer, Whitesburg, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Abraham andAnn (Dismukes) Moore, was born near Raleigh, N. C, in 1814. His paternal grandfather was Abraham Moore, who was a soldier in the revolutionary army.      His maternal grandparents, George and Elizabeth (Thompson) Dismukes, were    North Carolinians, and his grandfather Dismukes served through the revolutionary war as a major in the patriot army. Mr. Moore's father was born and reared in North Carolina, but his father and mother died, and he was left an orphan when a very small child and was reared in Pittsboro, N. c., in the home of his grandfather Dismukes. He learned but little from his books but was taught to work, and thanks to his inborn will-power and energy has made a success. In 1834 when twenty years of age he came to Georgia and settled in Carroll county. The following fall he located where he now lives, where for many miles around the clearings were few and far between. He came to Georgia with a horse and a pair of saddle-bags; now he has 1,800 acres of good land lying on the Chattahoochee river, on which he has one of the most productive and best improved farms in all that section, and ranks as one of the most substantial and reliable citizens, as well as one of the best farmers in Carroll county. During the war a small battle was­ fought on his farm, during which shot and shell flew thick and fast all about. All  the windows in his house were shattered, and there remains a hole in the wall of his house where one shell, coming into a window, passed out on the opposite side. Fortunately no one about the premises was hurt. Mr. Moore has owned a ferry across the Chattahoochee River at this place from the time he first settled there. On one occasion he was getting some parties across the river who were fleeing before the Federal army, among them Mr. William Amos, when the skirmish began. Before the boat reached the opposite shore the troops reached the river and fired upon the passengers. Mr. Amos fell by his side, but he stood by them and the boat, and at the risk of his own life saved them In 1837 Mr. Moore was married to Mrs. Caroline (nee Martin) Malone, daughter of Benjamin Martin, of Jones county, granddaughter of Mr. Lester, of the same county. Mr. and Mrs. Moore­ were the parents of seven children, five of whom are living: Mrs. W. A. Parks; Mrs. Robert Early; Mrs. W. W. Kelly; George W., deceased; James D., Jr.; Dr. John F., deceased, and Benjamin F., The two surviving sons, J. D. and B. F. Moore, are hardware merchants of the Moore & Handley Hardware company, Birmingham, Ala.
 



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C. C. MORRIS, farmer, Bowdon, Carroll Co., Ga., son of J. L. and Elizabeth (Almond) Morris, was born in Carroll county in 1856. His paternal grand­parents, William and Hannah (Biggars) Morris, were natives of South Carolina, came to Georgia early in this century, and settled in what is now De Kalb county. He was a farmer, and, also, a Missionary Baptist minister and preached in the old log churches. He was a soldier in the revolutionary army. Mr. Morris' father was born in De Kalb county in 1826, and was a farmer. He enlisted in 1861, was a lieutenant in his company and remained in the army through the conflict. His maternal grandparents, Asbern and Jane (Biggars) Almond, were early settlers, and the grandfather was a revolutionary soldier. Mr. Morris was reared on a farm in Carroll county, and received a fair common school education. Adopting farming as a pursuit, but without means, he acquired a good farm, and is among those at the head of the list as progressive farmers, manages well, is much esteemed and is prosperous. He has a tract of more than 200 acres of choice land, productive, with good improvements. In 1882 Mr. Morris married Miss Rebecca Lovvorn, daugh­ter of W. D. Lovvorn, an old and influential settler, who has borne him six children: Eva, Mattie, Joseph and Otto, living; and Lillian and Anna, deceased. Himself and wife are members of the Baptist church.


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H L. MORROW, farmer and miller, Whitesburg, Carroll Co., Ga., son of William H. and Nancy (Elliott) Morrow, was born in Newton county, Ga.,March 15, 1823.   His grandparents on his father's side, Robert and Nancy(Herly)Morrow, were Virginians, and came to Georgia in 1795. His grandfather was a soldier in the revolutionary war. His grandparents on his mother's side, George and Mary (Cloud) Elliott, were natives of Virginia, and the grandfather was a soldier in the patriot army during the revolutionary war. Mrs. Morrow grand­-uncle, Zeke Cloud, joined the patriot army when but fourteen years of age, and remained with it until independence was achieved. Mr. Morrow's father was born 'May 12, 1788, in what is now Morgan county, Ga., and his mother was born Dec. 12, 179°, in what is now Jasper county, Ga. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, in which he served as quartermaster. He also served as sheriff of Newton county for many years. Mr. Morrow was reared in Newton county until he was twelve years old, when the family moved to Henry county. His father died when he was only seventeen months old, and from that time until he became of age he had a hard time of it. When he first went to school it was under an old tent, then in the old-time dirt floor log school house, with puncheon seats and stick and mud chimney, etc. But such was the necessity for work to help his widowed mother that he received very little schooling-he couldn't be spared from the field. In 1863, he enlisted in Company E (Capt. Mann), Seventh Georgia regiment, was at one time acting lieutenant, and most of the time was on guard duty in and around Atlanta. Mr. Morrow was married Dec. 17, 1844, to Miss Mary A. Gilbert-born in Henry county, Ga., Nov. 15, 1826-daughter of Matthew and Tabitha (Mathews) Gilbert, North Carolinians, who came to Georgia, and settled in the woods in Henry county in 1820. Eleven children have blessed this union, of whom eight are now living: James R., born Sept. 12, 1845; Jane T., Jan. 19, 1847; Zachary T., Feb. 19, 1849; Nancy T., Dec. 3, 1850; Polly Ann, Feb. 4, 1853; William D., Jan. 3°, 1855; Millard F., Dec. 25, 1856; Mary J., Dec. _4, 1859; Lizzie 0., Sept. 12, 1862; Roberta L., June 7,1865; Joe J., July 3°,1870. When he was married he had nothing but good health and habits, a robust constitution and sturdy manhood trained to labor and self-reliance. The first year after his mar­riage he rented land, afterward bought some land and settled on it. In 1848 he commenced milling in a small way, and as he prospered added more and improved machinery. It is, however, what is known as a "custom mill," grinding for toll, and makes meal and flour as good as the best. Mr. Morrow has a splendid mill property on a well-improved and productive 80o-acre plantation, besides a pleasant residence and "home place" in Whitesburg. His success is a striking and instructive illustration of what is possible in Georgia, with industry, economy and integrity, when coupled with a determined will. Though not a millionaire in the popular sense he is wealthy, as are many thousands just like him, beyond compu­tation. No citizen of Carroll county is more highly esteemed; Fifty years a master Mason he has exemplified its teachings in his life. Himself and wife are members of the United Congregational church.
 


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 M. E. MURPHEY, farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of .William and Martha (Murphey) Murphey, was born 111 Talbot county, Ga., 111 1827. His father_was born in South Carolina, in 1798, came to Georgia when a a young man on pack horses, and settled in the woods in Wilkes county, where he cleared a farm. A few years afterward he removed to Talbot county, and thence to Sumter county, in 1836. He was a soldier in the Indian war of that date, and lived to be seventy-six years of age. Mr. Murphey's mother was a Murphey, who first mar­ried James Willis, who died, and then she married Mr. Murphey. M. E. Murphey was reared in Sumter county and educated in the historic dirt floor log school house, split log seats and mud and dirt chip:ll1ey,etc., and walked three miles... generally barefooted, to school. In 1861, he enlisted in what was known as the "Nelson Rangers," under Capt. Nelson, who was killed at Tupelo, Miss. and was succeeded by Capt. Ragland. He experienced some very hard and trying service, and was engaged in many very hot skirmishes, but although he kept in the field until the war ended, he escaped both wounds and capture. When he came out of the war all he had, he says, "was a spell of chills and fever and a horse." He first went to Coweta county and went to work on a farm with a vim, and remained there until 1883, when he moved into Carroll county, where he now owns a 600 ­acre well-improved farm, a beautiful home in Carrollton, and "cash in advance." Mr. Murphey was married in 1860 to Miss Sarah Kampson -born in South Carolina daughter of Peter and Mary' (Long) Kampson, natives of South Caro­lina who came to Georgia from that state in 1844. This union has been blessed with six children: Peter, Beulah, Jeffy, Katie, William J. and Lizzie. Mrs. Murphey, who was a member of the Lutheran church, died in 1892.


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B J. M'CAIN, merchant, Temple, Carroll Co., Ga., son of William B. and Margaret N. (McCain) McCain, was born in Troup county in 1843. His grand­parent, Hugh McCain, was a native of North Carolina and, was a soldier in the revolutionary war. His parents were born in North Carolina, came to Georgia and settled in Troup county in 1840, where his father cleared a farm and built for himself two mills, merchant and saw mill. His maternal grandparents, Joe and Margaret (Moore) McCain, were also born in North Carolina. Mr. McCain was reared on the farm and his early education was obtained at a country school. In 1863 he enlisted in Company F (Capt. B. F. Long), cavalry, with which he served six months. He then enlisted in Company F (Capt. George Austin), Georgia State troops, with -which he remained until the close of the war, and of which he was a corporal. He was in two battles, both fought at Coosahatchie, and at the surrender he stacked arms at Albany, Ga. After the war he returned to the farm, but in 1868 he attended school in Carrollton. The next year he worked on the farm, and the. one following he attended a-private school four months. In 1871 he finished his preparatory commercial education by attending Moore's business university at Atlanta. In August, 1872" he engaged as a clerk with J. C. Carter, with whom he remained four years. After that he entered into partnership with Gus Smythe, but at the' end of fifteen months he sold out to his partner and formed a new partnership with L. P. Barnes. Twelvemonths after he retired from this business, and with George: and John, McGahee and 1. Y. Sawtell organ­ized the Atlanta Wild Land Company. He remained in this company ten months, and then, in the fall of 1878, located in Simsville, Ga., and engaged in a general merchandise business in which he was satisfactorily successful. In 1882 he closed out in Simsville and permanently settled in Temple, where 'he is now, and where he has built a large and profitable trade, and is a leading business man and citizen of that part of the county. In 1875 Mr. McCain was married to Miss 1;'allulah V., daughter of Maj. D. A. and Nancy W. (Collier) Cook, of Atlanta, by whom he has one child surviving, Ida Tallulah. They have an adopted son, William B. Mr. McCain is a master Mason' and he and his family are members of the Methodist church. He exerts a well-earned influence in the community and county. 

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G A. M'DANIEL, farmer and miller, Victory, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John and Sarah 1. (Terry) McDaniel, was born in Elbert county, Ga., in 1820. His grandparents, Henry and Mary (Rucker) McDaniel, were natives of Virginia whence they migrated to South Carolina. They afterward came to Georgia, but in it few years returned to South Carolina, where. they died. Mr. McDaniel's father was born in Virginia in 1781, came to Georgia in 1810, and settled in, Elbert county, where he remained until 1822, when he moved to Henry (now De Kalb) county. The only property he had 'was a horse, that ran away, and he had to make his crop with a grubbing hoe. He walked to South Carolina to get another horse. He lived in a tent until he could build a log cabin (dirt floor), had to go twenty miles to mill, and lived principally on corn pone and wild game. His mother was the daughter of Henry and Mary (Baldwin) Terry, native South Carolinians. Her father was a Methodist Episcopal minister and devoted his life to church work. Mr. McDaniel was reared in De Kalb county, and educated at schools taught in the old-time dirt-floor log house. About 1847 he went to Atlanta, but staid there but a short time. He then went to Spalding county, where he remained until 1854, when he removed to Bowdon, where he farmed until the war began, then he- engaged_ in- merchandising, and continued it for twenty years. He then moved to the farm where he now lives, on which he had years before built a mill. Beginning without anything, he now owns 2,000 acres of excellent land, including one of the best improved farms in the county and a mill site, and is one of the richest men in Carroll. Mr. McDaniel was married Dec. 25, 1850, in Spalding county, to Miss Martha J. Lavender-born in Henry county-daughter of James and Malinda (Ansley) Lavender, native Georgians. This union has been blessed with ten children: Sarah A, Mary M. deceased; Eliza A, Ella J., John L., Martha J, Ida B., T. Henry, Lula B. and Emma B. Mr. and Mrs. McDaniel are members of the Methodist Protestant church and he is regarded as one of Carroll's very best and worthiest citizens.                           
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JOHN C. M'GARITY, farmer, Victory, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Jones and Mary (Embry) McGarity, was born near Atlanta in 1848. His paternal grandfather was a native of Ireland and came to America before the revolutionary war and was a soldier in the army. His grandfather, Abner McGarity, was a native of South Carolina and came to Georgia in an ox cart and settled, in the woods in Elbert county in 1795 and cleared a farm. Here Mr. McGarity's father was born and reared on a farm. Starting out in life for him­self, he came to De Kalb county, where he lived until 1848, when he removed, to Carroll county, settled in the woods, and cleared a farm, where Mr. McGarity now lives. Mr. McGarity's mother was a daughter of John Embry, and his mother was a distant relative of Thomas Jefferson. Mr. McGarity was reared on the farm and was educated at the common county school. When the war began he was too young to enter the army, but he served a short time before the war closed. He supplemented his farm work by teaching school, and taught from 1871 to 1892. In the meantime he was elected justice of the peace, and served eight years. In 1892 he was elected to represent the county in the general assembly. Mr. McGarity was married in 1875 to Miss Martha J Darden born and reared in Coweta county-daughter of Elzie and Susan (Upshaw)Darden.  Her father was a soldier in the Confederate army. This union has been b1essed with six children: Pearl, Ruth, David, John, Joseph and Katie. Mr. and Mrs. McGarity are members of the Baptist church. Mr. McGarity is an acknowledged leader in Carroll county and no citizen commands more respect.
                                       
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WILEY NIXON, farmer, Mandeville, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Joe and Martha (Ward) Nixon, was born in Oglethorpe county, Ga., Sept. 15, 1816. His father was born in what is now Wilkes county, Ga., about 1775.(This territory  was acquired from the Indians in 1773 and Wilkes county was laid out in 1777). He was bound out when a boy and learned the car­penters trade; when older engaged in farming also, and was a soldier in the war of 1812. He moved to Coweta county in 1830, settled in the woods and lived in a dirt floor log cabin. Mr. Nixon's maternal grandparents, Sam and Eda (Hud­son) Ward, were among the early settlers of that part of Georgia. Mr. Nixon grew to manhood on the farm and attended school at the historic log school­house. The first house he lived in the boards were fastened on with wooden pins. He came to Coweta county with his father and lived in that county until 1874, when he moved and settled on a partly-cleared farm in Carroll county, afterward clearing what he wanted. He began life very poor, has worked hard on the farm all his life, and although not rich he has a competency and is rich in the possession of sincere friends, and the consciousness of a well-spent life. He owns 600 acres of good land, a farm well-improved and a good home in which to spend his declining years. Mr. Nixon was married to Miss Elizabeth Fullenlove (born in Coweta county), daughter of Lud and Alsa (Freeman) Fullenlove. To them nine children have been born: Weldin I., J. Page, Fannie, Rebecca, Meda, Ludwell, Nanna, William and Ada. Mr. Nixon has been a member of the masonic fraternity more than forty years, and is regarded as one of the most substantial, and is among the most respected of the county's citizens.Return to Top


WILLIAM T. OGLETREE, farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Absalom and Matilda (Stewart) Ogletree, was born in Monroe county, Ga., in 1834. His paternal grandparents were William and Martha (Bird) Ogletree. His grandfather was born in Virginia in 1764, and came to Georgia and settled in Wilkes county about 1784, and was married in 1785. When he came to the county it was a wooded wilderness, and he suffered all the trials, hardships and privations incident to pioneer life. He was the Daniel Boone of Wilkes county. Mr. Ogletree's father was born in Wilkes county in 1811 where he was reared on a farm, but at the age of twenty he entered the ministry and continued in it through life: His mother was born in Oglethorpe county, Ga., and was the daughter of Thomas and Nancy (Russell) Stewart, early settlers of the county. Her father was a farmer and lived to a good old age. Mr. Ogletree's mother, eighty years old, is still living. Mr. Ogletree was reared on the farm in Ogle­thorpe county and received a good common-school education in Monroe county, Ga. After receiving his education he taught school awhile. In 1861 he en­listed in Company F. (Capt. D. J. Bailey, afterward Capt. Andrews, Capt. Bailey having been elected colonel), Thirtieth Georgia regiment, which was assigned to Gen. Mercer's command. He participated in some of the most hotly-contested battles of the conflict. Among them: Jackson, Miss., and Chickamauga, where his brigade opened the fight; Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, New Hope church and in nearly every engagement from Resaca to Atlanta. He was wounded at Peachtree creek, Atlanta which compelled him to retire for two months. On his recovery he hastened to rejoin his command, with which he remained until Dec. 16, 1864} when he was captured at Nashville and sent to Johnson’s island and held until the close of the war.  On his release he came to Spalding county, Ga., where he remained until 1881, when he removed to Car­roll county and settled where he now lives. He had to begin anew after the war, and in the battle of life has been as courageous and true as he was on the tented field, and has done well. Mr. Ogletree was married in 1859 to Miss Cordelia Colbert (born in Spalding county), daughter of Albert G. Colbert, descendant from the early emigrants from Ireland to this country. One child only, Wilbur S., has blessed this union. Mr. Ogletree is a member of the Christian church and his wife is a member of the Methodist church. While living in Spalding county before the war he served as a justice of the peace. Mr. Ogletree is one of Carroll's most substantial,  as well as one of its most highly esteemed citizens, to whom his neighbors are attached because of his kindly nature.                        Return to Top


HENRY G. PARKER, farmer, Mandeville, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John and Margaret (Byrum) Parker, was born in Pike county, Ga., in 1841. His paternal grandfather, Enoch Parker, came from North Carolina to Georgia in 1795, and settled in the woods in Lincoln county, where his father was born in 1800. His maternal grandfather, Beverly Byrum, was a native of North Carolina, came from there to Georgia in an ox-cart early in this century, and cleared himself a farm and a home it1 the virgin forest. Mr. Parker was reared in Pike county,- worked on the- farm, and went to school only four days. In 1862, he enlisted in Company H (Capt. Redman), Forty-fourth Georgia regiment, and remained in the service until May, 1863. He was in two hard fought battles-Gainesville and Sharpsburg, in which last his company had twenty-six killed. He lost his right leg, and being thereby disabled for further service, came home. He went to Coweta county and lived there and farmed until 1875, when he removed to Carroll county and bought a nice 300-acre farm, which he has paid for and so improved as to make him a comfortable home. He came out of the war a very poor and a disabled man, yet has secured a good home by his own industry and economy, and reared a not small family of children. Mr. Parker was married in 1868 to Miss Sarah Cannon -born in Pike county -daughter of George and Mary (Elliott) Cannon, who were among the early settlers of Pike county. This union has been blessed with eight children: Jennie, Mary, Henry S., George, Lizzie, Ella, Harriet and Leila. Mrs. Parker is a member of the Protestant Methodist church, and Mr. Parker is worthily. held in esteem by the community in which he lives. Return to Top


 

WILLIAM H. MALONE, merchant, Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Ga., son of J.D.and Mary (Hale) Malone, was born in Atlanta, Ga., in 1858. His paternal grandparents were Jones and Lucy Dumas) Malone his grandmother Dumas  being a Huguenot refugee. Mr. Malone's father was born in Union district, S. C., in 1811. He was educated at the Presbyterian college at Marysville, Tenn., and came to Georgia and settled in Atlanta in 1852, Reengaged in merchandizing and continued in business until Gen. Sherman entered the city in 1864. He was then sent a prisoner to Cambridge City, Ind., where he remained until after the surrender, when he came back to a farm he had in Cobb county, Ga. Soon after that he re-entered business in Atlanta, but in 1869 he had the misfortune to be burned out, and returned to his farm. Subsequently he went to Villa Rica, where he died in 1887. He was a local preacher in the Methodist church, an active worker and a liberal contributor to all movements having in view the advancement of the church and the progress and up-building of the city. It was a genuine pleasure to him to be helpful to others, especially the poor, and many are the deeds, agree­ments and wills on record in Fulton county written by him. A true man and a sincere Christian, he lived beloved and died regretted.

On his mother's side Mr. W. H. Malone traces his ancestry far back and through prominent family lines. The great-great-grandfather, George Hale, came from England to America with Lord Baltimore. George, a descendant of his, was a soldier during the revolutionary war, and married a Miss Nancy Grant, who was a Scotch refugee. Alexander Hale, their son and Mrs. Malone's grand­father, was born in Baltimore, Md., in 1768, and some time not long afterward his parents migrated direct to territory since erected into the state 'of Tennessee, and settled in what is now Blount county. John B. Hale; Mrs. Malone's father, son of Alexander and Sarah (Billingslea) Hale, was born in Washington County, Tenn., and married Miss Jane McClung, daughter of William and Euphemia (Cunningham) McClung. The families of her parents were early settlers, and prominent in Savannah, Ga., in social and commercial circles. Early in the his­tory of Tennessee her parents moved to that state, and the house they lived in is still standing. Hon. J. C. Hale, Mrs. Malone's brother, is an ex-state senator of Tennessee, and now holds a very important position under the government at Washington. Mr. Malone was reared in Atlanta, where he received a good education, and afterward took an eclectic course at the University of Georgia. At the age of eighteen he began teaching, and taught as many as six different schools in different places. A part of the time he taught in Forsyth county, where he read law and was admitted to the bar and practiced four years. He taught school in Villa Rica three years. When his father died, 1887, he abandoned all other pursuits and assumed control of his estate, in the management of which he has been pre-eminently successful, and has become the leading merchant and citi­zen of that part of the county. He took great interest in the establishment of a high grade school in Villa Rica and was instrumental in the accomplishment of the object. He was elected president of the board of directors, and occupies that position to-day. Every movement inaugurated for advancing the interests of Villa Rica has had his support and substantial aid, and he contributes liberally to all church and moral enterprises. In 1894 he reluctantly consented to become a can­didate for the general assembly, and received 975 out of about 1,200 votes, although for competitors he had two of the best citizens of the county. As he lives in an extreme corner of the county the result is a very significant compliment. Mr. Malone was married in: 1884 to Miss Mary A. Knox, born and reared in Forsyth county, Ga., daughter of Dr. J. R. and Martha (McAfee) Knox. Her parents on both sides are among the best known and most influential families in Cherokee county, Ga. To this happy union three children have been-born: Robert K., William H., and Ralph G.

Mr. and Mrs. Malone are active and prominent members of the Methodist church, and Mr. Malone is a member of the Masonic fraternity. In view of his age and what he has already attained to in general popularity, in hi5­standing in the commercial world and in the political field, it is safe to predict for him wealth, influence and political honors-prosperity and usefulness.
                                       
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 F. F. PRITCHETT, merchant Villa Rica, Carroll Ga.,  son of Robert and Anna Eliza (Alexander) Pritchett, was born in Virginia 111 1849. His grand­father, Joshua Pritchett, was of French descent, born in Virginia, and of considerable local influence. His father was a native of Virginia and a manufacturer ­of tobacco, a business which he followed with success and profit until 1856, when he came to Georgia and settled on a farm, where he remained until he died. His, maternal grandparents, Frank and Nancy (Bell) Alexander, were natives of New­ton, S. C., whence they went to Mobile. There he engaged in business, and was also agent for the bay boats many years. Subsequently he was appointed to a position in the custom house which he served unti1 he was seventy five years old, when he retired and located on the bay, finishing his days there. He lived in Mobile and on the bay about fifty years, and bought his land from the French. Mr. Pritchett was reared mostly in Georgia, and received but a limited education. He was too young to enter the army during the war, but he served in what was known as the home guard. He went into business in Villa Rica and soon, by assiduous attention and energy, established a large and profitable trade. In 1882 he built one of the largest and best business houses in the little city, and in 1888 formed a partnership with W. H. and G. B. Malone, and has established the best paying  business of any person or firm in that part of the state. Mr. Pritchett is thoroughbred, thorough-going business man of the strictest integrity, possessing the unusual confidence of the people; while Mr. Malone is a young man of irre­proachable character and remarkable business and financial ability. Mr. Pritchett was married in 1881 to Miss Lucy J. Malone, born and reared in Carroll county, daughter of Jerry D. and Mary (Bale) Malone, by whom he has had four children: Karl, Robert H., Florence, and Mary E. Mr. and Mrs. Pritchett are active mem­bers of the Presbyterian church.Return to Top


HENRY W. REID, farmer, Mandeville, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Robert and Lucinda (Chandler) Reid, was born in Carroll county in 1841. His paternal grandfather, Henry Reid, was ac native-of South Carolina, and migrated to Georgia­ about 1820. His father was born in South Carolina in 180.6, and came with his parents to Georgia. They settled in Gwinnett county, and he remained with them until he was eighteen years of age, when he went to Franklin county, Ga. Sub­sequently he removed to Carroll county, settled in the woods and made his log cabin home where the subject of this sketch now lives. He was a soldier in the Florida Indian war. Mr. Reid's maternal grandparents, Wyatt and Mary B. (Liner) Chandler, were natives of North Carolina. Mr. Chandler was a soldier in the war of 1812, removed to Georgia and settled in the woods in Carroll county early in its his­tory, his nearest neighbors being seven miles away. Mr. Reid was reared on the farm where he now lives, and was educated at the common schools of the county. In 1862 he enlisted in Company H (Capt. Parrish), Fifty-sixth Georgia regiment, but he remained only a short time-as his father was taken seriously sick, and he, being the only child, came home arid remained with him until his recovery-send­ing a substitute to take his place in the army. In 1863 he, enlisted in a state battalion, in which he served six months, and then re-entered the regular service, enlisting in Company E, Capt. Shuford, First Georgia cavalry, and served until the surrender. He joined the army at Resaca, under Gen. Johnston, and saw much very hard service between there and Atlanta. On one occasion a comrade near him was shot through the head and some of the blood and brains flew on him, leaving stains which remained until the clothing was worn out. A wife and two children and an old cavalry horse were the sum total of his possessions at the close of the war. But with a light heart and a strong will he went to work to regain lost ground, and now he has a well-improved farm of 500 acres and a comfortable home. Mr. Reid was married Dec. 20, 1860, to Miss Nancy C­. born in Meriwether county, Ga. daughter of James G. and Sisley (Hammock) Davenport. . Mr. and Mrs. Reid have had thirteen children born to them, of whom James R., Charles J., Henry M., Martha F., Sallie A., John T., Nancy I., George W., Amanda, Elijah, and Irene J. are living, and Lucinda and William R. are dead. Husband and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist church, and no  citizens of the county are more highly esteemed than they.Return to Top


ALBERT C. ROBINSON, merchant and farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., GA., son of John W. and Mary M. (Burrow) Robinson, was born in 1856. His grandfather, John Robinson, was a native of Virginia, whence he removed to North Carolina, and subsequently to Georgia and settled in the woods in Carroll County; near where the subject of this sketch now lives. Mr. Robinson's father was born in North Carolina in 1827 and came with his parents to Georgia when a small boy. His mother was a daughter of William and Eliza (Bradbury) Bur­row who were among the earliest settlers in that part of the State. His father enlisted in 1861 and remained in the service until the surrender.  Mr. Robinson was reared on the farm and in consequence of the war, which was at its fiercest when he was of school age, his education was limited. But he was endowed with pluck and perseverance, and enterprise and energy, and was also possessed of a thorough-going disposition, which have told wonderfully on his prosperity. He first began business at Shiloh, but last year he removed his business to his farm near that place. When he was married he was not worth a dollar; now he has a fine, large farm and is doing a large and increasing mercantile business. Mr. Robinson was married in 1879 to Miss Mary M. Arthur, daughter of Kabus and Ann (Barnes) Arthur, who were among the earliest settlers of Marion county, Ga. Mr. Arthur lost his life during the late war. Seven children have blessed this union: Emory C., William M., Zella V., Luther L., Verdie E., Lizzie M. and Minnie Pearl. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson are members of the M. E. church. He is one of the rising young men of Carroll county with a bright future.Return to Top


MARTIN ROOP, deceased, one of the earliest settlers, and when living, a very prominent citizen of Carroll county, was the son of John and Phoebe (Pilcher) Roop, native South Carolinians, and was born in South Carolina in 1810. He attended and received his education at the old field school. In 1845 he migrated from South Carolina to Georgia (nine days on the road by wagon) and settled in Jackson county. At the end of a year he bought a piece of cleared land, on which he lived four years, and then removed to Coweta county, and cleared a part of the tract for a farm. When he made this change his wife rode nearly all the way on horseback. After remaining here four years he removed to Carroll county and settled where the flourishing town of Roopville, named in honor of his son, John K. Roop, now stands. There was not a stick amiss. To many it will sound odd to relate that when Mr. Roop settled in Carroll county, his family made use of the now unknown (and almost forgotten) pewter dishes, and that Mrs. Roop carded, spun and wove the cotton and wool into cloth, and then made the clothing for the family. During the war all the time that could be spared from household duties she employed in providing socks and clothing for the soldiers. Mr. Roop himself was exempt by law from going into the army. Mr. Roop was married in 1839 to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Abraham and Lucy (Bradford) King, South Carolinians, by whom he had ten children: John K, William W., Robert H., Benjamin J., Thomas M., Henry 0., James G., Sarah Elizabeth, Savannah and George W. Mr. Roop was made a master Mason dur­ing the war and himself and wife were members of the Missionary Baptist church. The family have been, and is yet, one of prominence and influence, and enjoy the confidence and esteem of the people.Return to Top


JOHN K. ROOP, leading merchant, Roopville, Carroll Co., Ga., was born in Union district, South Carolina, Oct. 20, 1839. He was reared on a farm, and what schooling he had was obtained at the common country schools of that. period.. When grown he taught school some himself. In 1861, when the civil war reached the fighting point, he enlisted for six months in_Company D (Capt J. R. Thomason); First Georgia Regiment, and at the end of that time he enlisted in a cavalry company in Phillips' Legion, and remained in the service until the surrender. While in the service he did a great deal of scouting, notwithstanding which he participated in many of the hardest-fought battles of the war, among them: Sharpsburg, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Culpeper courthouse, Mine Run, etc. He was also a considerable time with Gen. Wade Hampton. As was the case with many thousands he came out of the war without anything but its sad experience, and entered upon the work of reconstruction in Carroll county. In 1880 he opened a store, building the first house on the spot; established a mill in 1874 and has succeeded in securing a large and profitable trade. Population increased, and a post-office being wanted one was estab­lished in 1881 and named "Roopville," for the founder of the embryo town. H_ served as justice of the peace at Roopville for eight years, and when the board of county commissioners was organized in 1886 he was elected a member and continued in office six years, until 1892. He has been solicited to become a candidate for the general assembly, but has always refused, as he craved no political honors. Mr. Roop was married in 1872 to Miss Eliza Moore (born in Henry county), daughter of W. H. and Sarah (Barnes) Moore, natives of Georgia. Her grandfather, Joshua Moore, was an early settler in Henry county. Mr. and Mrs. Roop have had born to them five children: Nora L., wife of Dr. B. J. Veal; Henry A., Charles c., Bessie and Fannie. Mr. Roop was a prominent member of the Farmers' alliance and president of the Carroll county organization. He is a master Mason, and has been worshipful master of his lodge many years. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist church. Beginning with nothing at the close of the war, he has become the leading merchant in his part of the county; has acquired some two thousand acres of fine land, and is recognized as one of the most influential citizens of Carroll county.
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GEORGE W. ROOP, merchant, Roopville, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Martin and Elizabeth Roop, was born on a farm where Roopville now stands, Sept. 25, 1858. He was educated at the common country schools, and after completing his education, he in 1880 engaged in a general merchandise business in Carroll­ton with profitable results. Two years later he went "down the river,"- where he remained two years, still prospering and then returned to his old home, Roop­ville, where he is in business today. He started on $200 given him by his father, which he has used with such superior judgment as to place him on the high road to fortune. He has now a large store-house and stock, a large and profitable trade and a fine home, his store and dwelling, the result of his own supervision and contributed labor. He stands high as a business man of capacity and in­tegrity, and takes a great interest in all movements promotive of the advancement of his community, to which he gives liberal financial encouragement. Mr. Roop was married in 1880 to Miss Eliza Almon (born in Heard county, Ga.), daughter of Zachariah and Antoinette (Babb) Almon, by whom he has four children:  Major C., Quanah Parker, William and Addie. Mr. and Mrs. Roop are members of the Baptist church, and Mr. Roop is a master Mason.Return to Top


MOSES R. RUSSELL, superintendent of county schools, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Harris and Leah (Steed) Russell, was born in Coweta county, Ga. in 1835. His grandparents, Gabriel and Patsey (Bell) Russell, planters, were born and lived and died in North Carolina. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, and died at the age of sixty-six years. His wife lived to be ninety-two years of age.  Mr. Russells parents were born in North Carolina, migrated to Georgia in a wagon in 1833, and settled in the woods in Coweta county; occupied a dirt floor log cabin which a brother who had come to Georgia built for them a year or two before. Mr. Russell's mother was the daughter of Sarah (Harris) Steed, born in North Carolina, whose ancestors were among the pioneers of that state.

Mr. Russell was reared on the plantation and was educated in a dirt floor log cabin school-house, with its big fire-place and dirt and stick chimney, and its square holes cut through the logs to let the light in. He rather gleefully relates the following incident of his boyhood days: When fourteen years old a brother was married. Until then he had worn only the "regulation" copperas-colored clothes, but his mother, wishing him to make as impressive an appearance as possible on so important an occasion, bought some blue cottonade goods costing about seventy-five cents, and made him a suit which excited the admiration of the girls and the envy of his boy schoolmates. When eighteen years of age he left home and went to Alabama, where he remained for twelve years, then returned to Georgia and settled in Carroll county on the farm where he now lives. He taught school several years and then merchandised at Lineville, Ala., about two years, after which he engaged in farming. In I862 he enlisted in Company D, Capt. Hester, Seventeenth Alabama regiment, Col. Johnson, and was stationed at Mobile about eighteen months. Becoming disabled by sickness he returned home and sent a substitute. But in 1864 he enlisted in Company B, De Armand’s battalion, with which he remained and helped to fire the last cannon of the war at Silver run, Talladega county, Ala., eight days after Gen. Lee's surrender, which killed thirteen Yankees. The Yankees afterward captured the gun and brought it to Georgia, and within a quarter of a mile of where Mr. Russell now lives they loaded it, then piled rails on it, which they set fire to, and when the cannon exploded it shot over the house in which he lives. He has been superintendent of county schools ten years, a member of the board of education seventeen years, of which he was president five years, and has been county commissioner eleven years; he has been on the executive committee of the State Agricultural society thirteen years, and one of the managers of the state fairs six years. In 1857 Mr. Russell was married to Miss Fannie' Bell (born in Coweta county), daughter of Sylvanus and Betsey (Stripe) Bell. Her parents were descendants of some of the first Scotch emigrants to North Carolina. Six children were the offspring of this union: Elizabeth, George B., Josephine, Robert L., Marvin E. and Katie. This wife, who was a devout member of the Methodist church, died April 23, 1873. Mr_ Russell celebrated his second marriage, with Miss Elizabeth L. Brown, Oct. 7, I873. Her parents, Franklin and Agnes (Stripe) Brown, were natives of North Carolina, but she was born in Coweta county. By this marriage he had seven children born to him: James H., Lula, Annie, Buena Vista, Frank, Hugh B. and Grover C. Mr. Russell is a member of the 1. O. O. F. and in Masonry a royal and select master. Himself and wife are active and influential members of the Methodist church. The many important and responsible county and state agriculture offices Mr. Russell holds show in what estimation' his fellow-citizens hold him, while in local social standing himself and family rank among the highest.
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 F FRANK SIKES, farmer, Villa Rica, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Darling and Sarah (Cochran) Sikes, was born in Baker county, Ga., in 1853. His parents were born in North Carolina, and migrated by wagon and on horseback to­ Georgia and settled in the woods in Baker county in 1851. There he had cleared a farm and had just got well settled when the "unpleasantness" was precipitated.

In 1861 he enlisted in Capt. Kendricks’ company, Fifty-first Georgia regiment, and was in the service nearly four years, and most of the time was "one of Stonewall Jackson's men," and was in the battle and under the command of that distinguished officer when he was killed. Mr. Sikes was a sharpshooter, and was killed at the battle of the Wilderness; He was always a farmer, and was a consistent member of the Baptist church. His mother was a daughter of Eli and Mary (Griffin) Cochran, also Carolinians, who came to Georgia and settled in Baker county about the time Mr. Sikes' family came. They, also, were member of the Baptist church. Mr. Sikes was reared in Baker county, received but little education, came to Carroll county when only sixteen years of age, and settled where he now lives. He had nothing but good health, pluck and self-reliance to start with, but was a live, wide-awake farmer, worked hard, and lived and managed closely, and now has a large enough farm, well improved, a two-story dwelling, and a good substantial barn and out-buildings. Mr. Sikes was married in 1875 to Miss Virginia Green-born and reared in Carroll county-daughter of Alexander and Eliza (Chappel) Green, by whom he has had three children: Walter c., Anna B., and Lois G. Mr. and Mrs. Sikes are members of the Mis­sionary Baptist church, and enjoy in the highest degree the respect and esteem of their friends and neighbors.Return to Top


ABNER A.SIMONTON, miller and cotton gin operator, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Albert and Mary (Reed) Simonton, was born in Alabama in 1849. His paternal grandparents, Abner and Nancy (Bailey) Simonton, were of Scotch-Irish ancestry and came to America before the revolutionary war. They first settled in Virginia, then moved to North Carolina, and finally, in 1805, came to Georgia in ox carts, and settled in the woods in Greene county ­encountering and suffering all the dangers incident to pioneer life. His maternal grandparents, James and Rebecca (Duke) Reed, were also early settlers. Mr. Reed was a soldier in the war of 1812. Mr. Simonton's father was born in Greene county in 1809, and died in 1859. Mr. Simonton was partly educated in the "old field" log school house, common in that day, with its dirt floor, slab seats, great fireplace in a chimney built of sticks and stiff mud, and square holes cut through the sides to let in the light. He began life after the war without a dollar, but full of energy and enterprise, and went to work to make a living and a competency. In 1873 he had the courage to go heavily in debt for an outfit for a corn mill, cotton gin and saw mill. To the corn mill machinery were added mills for making flour. His energy and determination were exemplified by his working in his mills, sawing lumber, grinding and ginning, oftentimes far into the night. His financially independent circumstances today amply attest his success. Besides of beautiful home in the outskirts of Carrollton, surrounded by a fine tract of land, he has a large plantation on the river, with fine water power, where his Mills are located. More than sixty years ago this power was utilized. In Sep­temb er 1830, corn mill machinery was put in operation here, and ground corn for t   he Indians; and in 1848 machinery for grinding wheat was added. With the ravages of war these went down, but the energy and progressive spirit of   Simonton have replaced them-the machinery improved and increased. In 1887 he had the misfortune to have his dwelling, tenement houses and outhouses, all except  his mills, miller's house and smithy-destroyed by a cyclone, but they have all been restored, and he now rejoices in being in better condition than ever before, and proudly contemplates and enjoys the reward of his enter­prise and labor. Mr. Simonton was married in 1878 to Miss Margaret Johnston, born in Catoosa county, Ga., in 1850, daughter of William H. and Susan (Adams) Johnston, who came to Georgia from North Carolina.  Five children have blessed this union:  Cora M., Susan R., Albert A., Margaret E., and William J.  Mr. Johnston, Mrs. Simonton’s father, came to Catoosa county in October 1846 as a pioneer Presbyterian minister, having consecrated himself to the Master’s cause.  Mr. Simonton is a master Mason and himself and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church.Return to Top


B. A SHARP, cotton broker and guano dealer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga.,Son of Andrew and Martha (Elliott) Sharp, was born in Alabama in 1840. His father, John Sharp, was born in the emerald isle, and came to the United States in 1818. He stopped in South Carolina a short time, and then, when about fifteen years of age, came to Georgia in an old-fashioned block-wheel cart, in which he afterward made many trips to South Carolina and back. He came as a teacher and followed that calling for many years. Mr. Sharp's mother, born in South Carolina, was a daughter of John Elliott, a soldier in the war of 1812, came from South Carolina to Georgia about 1835, lived in that state a few years, and then moved to Alabama, where her parents passed their lives. Mr. Sharp was reared on a farm in Alabama, and was educated in the historic log cabin school house. Thus equipped, he "opened school" himself, and was making a satisfactory record when the civil war broke out and he enlisted in 1861 in Company K-(Capt. E. B. Smith), Thirteenth Alabama regiment (Maj. Marks, Co1. B. D. Fry), which was assigned to the command of Gen. Raines. Among other engagements, he participated in the following important battles: Williams­burg, Seven Pines, and Richmond, and others in northern Virginia, was at Appomattox at the surrender, and walked all the way from there to Washington, Ga. He now began life in  earnest, without a dollar, farming on shares. He was industrious, saving, successful, and now has a choice 365-acre farm in the county, and an interest in forty acres close to-partly inside-the corporate limits of Carrollton. He is engaged also in buying cotton and selling guano. He served four years satisfactorily as county commissioner. Mr. Sharp was married in Alabama in 1866 to Aphra A., daughter of Asa W. and Eliza Roundtree. To them four children have been born: Emmett A., Belle, Leila, and Bertram. Mr. Sharp is a member of the Farmers' alliance, a Knight of Honor, a member of the I. O. O. F., and a Royal Arch Mason. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist church. No citizen is more esteemed than he for business capacity and integrity, and no family enjoys a more enviable social position than his.Return to Top


EDWIN R. SHARPE, editor and proprietor of the "Free Press," Carrollton,Carroll Co., Ga., son of William O. and Susannah (Harrell) Sharpe, was born ­in Chambers county, Ala. in 1841. His great-grandfather on his father's side, Rev. Thomas Reese, was a noted Presbyterian clergyman, and one of the signers of the Mecklenburg declaration. His paternal grandparents, Elam and Elizabeth (Miller) Sharpe, were natives of North Carolina, but moved to Pendleton, S. C, at an early age, where they lived and died. His father was born in South Carolina in 1819, and lived, in boyhood, in the same town with the great South Carolina statesman, Calhoun. When about seventeen years of age he left his South Car­olina home and went to West Point, Ga., in Troup county, where he engaged  as a clerk in a store, and later went into business with Dr. J. A. Chery, in which he remained several years. After his marriage, his wife's father having given him a fine tract, 600 acres, of land. in "Miller's Bend," he engage in farming. He was an enthusiastic and active politician, but would never accept an office. His great-grandfather on his mother's side, Miller, was born in Wales, was exiled on account  of some publication in London. and came to South Carolina and published the first newspaper issued in the state, the "Pen­dleton Messenger." Mr. Sharpe's maternal grandparents were Samuel and Susannah (Heath) Harrell, he being a native North Carolinian. Mr. Sharpe was reared in Chambers county, Ala., and received his early education in the common schools of the day. He then went to a college in Tennessee, to prepare for entering the state university of Virginia, but in about a year the war began, and he quit college and joined the state troops. Soon after he enlisted in the Fourth Georgia regiment, Gen. Dole's brigade, and served through the war,a long time as sergeant. He was in many hotly contested, fiercely fought battles, and was severely wounded in the battle of the Wilderness on the skirmish line at Charlestown, W. Va., each time in the leg, the last time receiving three separate wounds, and was temporarily disabled for active service. After the war he went to West Point, Ga., where he taught school three years, when he and Judge Longley began the publication of the West Point "Shield," and continued it until 1871. Mr. Sharpe then came to Carrollton, where he established the "Carroll County Times," and published it until 1882, when he sold it. He then went to Texas, but soon returned, and in 1883 established the "Free Press," which he has continued to publish with financial success. In addition to the paper he has profitably con­ducted a farming interest. In 1888 he was e1ected to represent his senatorial district in the general assembly, and in 1890 he was elected to represent the county in the same body. That he served his constituency faithfully and well is evidenced by his election in 1894 to represent his senatorial district again. In 1868 Mr. Sharpe was married to Miss Annie E., daughter of H. H. and Eliza Greene, an old Georgia family of Greene county, said to be related to Gen. Nathaniel Greene. To them eight children have been born: Edwin, Annie, Robert L., Hamilton H., Lucy E., William 0., Elam H., and Marcus L. He is a master Mason, and himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian church, in which he has been an elder since he was twenty-six years of age. He is progressive, "a man of  affairs, and deservedly popular and influential.Return to Top


WILLIAM M. SPENCE, farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Hiram and Angeline (Cheney) Spence, was born in Morgan county, Ga., in 1845. His paternal grandparents, George and Mary (Knight) Spence, were born in Maryland, came to Georgia in ox-carts in 1798 and settled in the woods in what is now Morgan county. He was a delegate to the secession convention, served many years as a justice of the peace and lived to be a very old man.. Mr. Spence's parents were born in Morgan county, his father in 1821, and removed to Carroll county in 1847, settling in the woods and clearing for a farm the place where Mr. Spence now lives. He was a justice of the peace many years. Dur­ing the war he served in the state militia and participated in the defense of Atlanta. Both parents were members of the Primitive Baptist church and were much esteemed by their neighbors. The parents of his mother, Thomas and Lucy Cheney, were born in Maryland and came to Georgia in 1798. They ranked among the best people in every respect. Mr. Spence was reared on the farm where he now lives, and taught by his mother, he learned his ABC's out of the old family bible. Then he attended school in a log cabin in the woods, with dirt floor, seats made of slabs and the chimney of sticks and mud, with square holes cut through the sides for windows. In March, 1864, he enlisted in Company K, Second Georgia regiment, known as state line troops, and after the Confed­erate army entered Georgia, served under Gens. Johnston and Hood. After the war he resumed_farming at which he has prospered and placed himself in comfortable circumstances. Mr. Spence was married in 1868 to Miss Delphia McPhearson (born in Carroll county), daughter of Elijah and Sarah McPhear­son, who migrated from Tennessee to Georgia and were among the early settlers of the county. To him nine children pave been born: Leon, Ella, Ida, Cora, William, Newton, Albert, Mary and Ivey. Mr. Spence is regarded as one of the county's most substantial and reliable citizens, and is highly respected by all who know him. Mrs. Spence is a member of the Primitive Baptist church. Return to Top


HENRY H. STRICKLAND, farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John M. and Sarah (Knight) Strickland, was born in Coweta county in 1842. His father was born in Butts county, Ga., in 1811 and his mother was a daughter of John Knight. Mr. Strickland was reared on the farm and received a good common school education. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B (Capt., after­ward Co. Ector) Thirteenth Georgia regiment, and was first W Gen. Lawton’s brigade, then in Gen. J. B. Gordons and lastly in Gen. Clement A. Evans'. He was with Gen. Evans when the following incident occurred: Gen. Evans received an order from Gen. Lee to assault and capture a certain position, but afterward, believing it too hazardous, Gen. Lee countermanded the order. When Gen. Evans received the first order he made the assault and received the counter order in the captured position. Mr. Strickland was in the battles at Cotton hill, Martinsburg, Winchester, Cedar run, the seven days' fight, Spottsylvania court house, Sharpsburg and second Manassas, and in innumerable skirmishes in the valley, at one thirty days of almost continuous fighting. He was wounded three times--at Sharpsburg, Cedar run and second Manassas--one wound disabling him for nearly three months, but he escaped capture.

After the war he attended Bowdon college two years and a half, afterward taught school three years and then engaged in fanning, at which he has prospered, owns a fine landed estate, including a farm and property in Bowdon. Mr. Strickland was married in 1871 to Miss Mary E. Camp, born in Coweta county, daughter of G. W. and Mary A.(Colbert) Camp, and to them ten children have been born: Maud, George, Henry, John, Sallie, Lillian, Colbert, Lee, Warner and Katie. Mr. and Mrs. Strickland and all of their children save Sallie, are members of the Methodist Episcopal church south, and Mr. Strickland is a Master Mason. He has honestly obtained the high estimation in which he is held.
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JAMES R. THOMASON, physician and surgeon, Mabry, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Bartlett and Mary (Thomason) Thomason, was born in Newton county, Ga.. in 1826. His great-grandfather, William Thomason, was born in Ireland and came to America before the revolutionary war and was a soldier in the patriot army. His grandfather, William Thomason, was born in Virginia, whence he migrated to South Carolina. His grandfather was a soldier in the war of 1812. His parents were born in Abbeville district, South Carolina, and came to Georgia and settled in the woods of what is now Walton county, in 1816. They came in a borrowed ox-cart, and when they reached their destination their "goods and chattels" were disposed under a large tree and their friend took his departure. He and his wife then cleared an "opening" and began to farm, their principal food being corn and wild game. After enjoying this luxurious life a few years they moved into what is now Newton county, where his father bought his first land and cleared a farm. In addition to farming he practiced as a botanic doctor in the neighborhood for a number of years. He also "exercised" as a Methodist exhorter, and on many occasions he went to his “ap­pointments" on foot and barefooted, and barefooted stood and delivered his  message. When he was married it was in a home-spun and wove home-made suit of white cotton cloth; it knew no dye pot. Dr. Thomason's grandfather on his mother's side, John Thomason, was a native of South Carolina and settled in what is now Newton county, early in the century. Dr. Thomason was reared on his father's farm and received his education in the primitive, oft described dirt floor log school-house, with its puncheon seats and mud and stick chimney. In 1844 he determined to be a doctor and began to study, he at the time being a clerk in a store where a doctor had an office, who gave him the privilege of using his books.

 In 1848 he went to his brother's in Coweta county, who became his preceptor. In 1849-50 he attended the medical college of Georgia at Augusta, and in 1850 located in Carroll county, remaining there three years; then removed to where he now lives. In 1860 he attended the Atlanta Medical college, and graduating just as the war begun, tendered his services to the Confederate army, which were rejected. He next made up a company and went to the army, but was sent home, not participating in a single battle. He managed, however, to serve awhile at one time during the war as captain of a militia company. After the war he resumed his practice, which he has continued since. In 1870 he was elected to represent his county in the general assembly and was re-elected in 1872, serving two terms. Dr. Thomason was married May 2, 1852; to Miss Maria L, born in Hancock county, Ga. in 1832, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth (Harris) Colbert, who moved to Coweta county in 1838. Her father was a Methodist preacher, born in Georgia in 1796, and was a son of John and Elizabeth Colbert. Mrs. Thomason's mother, born in South Carolina in 1806, was a daughter of Thomas and Martha Harris. To Dr. and Mrs. Thomason six children have been born: James H., Francis G., Walter c., Ben­jamin B., John M. and Joseph R.  Dr. Thomason is a member of the I. O. O. F. and has been a Master Mason since 1850. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist church, and he has been an ordained preacher since 1854.  He is a popular and useful citizen and is very much liked by the community in which he lives.Return to Top


D. N. TILLMAN, farmer, Carrollton, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Asa and Marinda (Sparks) Tillman, was born in Fayette county, Ga., in 1835. His father was born in South Carolina, and while yet a youth ran away from home. He went into the army during the war of 1812 as a substitute for a man named Felix Simonton and served through the war. In after life he drew a pension for this service. Mr. Tillman's maternal grandparents, John and Elizabeth (Small) Sparks, were natives of Ireland, who came to Georgia early in this century and were among the pioneer settlers of Newton county. Mr. Tillman was reared on a farm in Carroll county and went to school in all his life only six days. In 1861 he enlisted in Company F (Capt. Curtis), Nineteenth Georgia regiment, which was first assigned to Gen. Hampton's command, afterward to that of Gen. J. J. Archer and finally to Gen. Colquitt's brigade, in which he remained until the surrender. He participated in quite a number of battles, some of them the most important fought during the war. He was at Seven Pines, May 30 and June 1, 1862, and in the seven days' fight around Richmond, commencing June 26, 1862, and was wounded in the right breast by a ball near Gaines' Mill, June 27, 1862. He was at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862; at Mecklenburg, Dec. 13, 1862, where he was wounded in the left hand; Chancellorsville, May 1, 1863; Kings­ton, N. C. siege of Charleston, -Morris Island; Olustee, Fla., Feb. 20, 1864,where he was wounded across riglt arm;Bentonville; N. C. and the siege of Petersburg, June 18, 1864-, where he was wounded in the right leg by a piece of shell. He was in every battle in which his command was engaged except when temporarily disabled by wounds. He rendered good and faithful service in the ranks throughout the war. The war being over he returned to Carroll county and engaged in farming, and although he had to start on nothing but good health, a strong will and a determined spirit, he has a good, well-improved farm and comfortable home. Except serving eight years as justice of the peace, he has devoted all his time and energies to his farm, which he manages on the progressive principles of the day. Mr. Tillman was married in 1865 to Miss Mary A. McPherson, born and reared in Carroll county, daughter of Elijah and Sarah McPherson, early settlers of Carroll county, coming in 1829. To them five children were born: Amanda, Charles N., Henry, Dora and Daniel. Mrs. Till­man, who was a member of the Primitive Baptist church, died in 1885. Oct. 20, 1885, Mr. Tillman contracted a second marriage with Miss Nancy J. Adams, born in Carroll county, daughter of Robert and Martha A. (Jones) Adams, early set­tlers of Coweta county. This marriage has been blessed with three children: Samuel, Robert W. and John. Mr. and Mrs. Tillman are members of the Primi­tive Baptist church, and their unostentatious worth commands the general respect and esteem of all who know them.   Return to Top


J. THOMAS TOLBERT, farmer and retired stock-trader, Villa R1ca, Carroll Co., Ga., son of Roland A. and Elizabeth (Tolbert) Tolbert, was born in Villa Rica in 1836. His paternal great-grandparents, Thomas and Judia (Reeves) Tolbert, were natives of Ireland, camel to America in the last half of the last century and settled in North Carolina. He cleared and cultivated a farm, and also engaged in gold-digging. He was a' consistent member of- the Methodist church. Mr. Tolbert's father was born in North Carolina, July 3, 1799, and is now alive and in good health at the home of the subject of this sketch. His educational advantages were meager, as he had to work hard and long and late on the farm. He came to Georgia and settled in Madison county in 1827; but in 1832 came to Villa Rica to work the gold mines. He continued this until 1853, when he engaged in farming and followed it until 1872, when he went to live with his son. - When he came to Carroll the country and the mines were rough, whisky was freely drank and free fights of the fists and skull, rough-and-tumble sort, were common. Mr. Tolbert was usually "at home" for all comers, though he sought no conflict. He was a member of the military-force which escorted the Indians to their new homes, and draws a pension now for that service. He was the eldest of eight children, and is the only one now living. He is a devout and exemplary member OF the Methodist church: Mr. Tolbert's maternal grandparents were Josiah and Bersheba (Cran­ford) Tolbert. He was born in North Carolina, and she was of English parentage; was born in 1795 and died in March 25, 1872. She was a strict member of the Methodist church from childhood, and was the mother of six children, who all grew to maturity, and two of whom are now living-a daughter and the subject of this sketch.  

J. Thomas Tolbert was reared on the farm, and work was such an imperative necessity that he attended school but little. In 1862, he enlisted in Company A, Ninth Georgia battalion artillery, Maj. Austin Leyden, with which he served until July, 1863, when he was transferred to Company E, First Georgia cavalry. On one occasion he and five 'others were out on a scout and suddenly came upon a company of guerrillas, who chased them five miles, shooting at them all the time; but they finally escaped. He was in many hard fights, but never wounded. - At the siege of Knoxville-1864-he was captured by the same men, an interesting coincidence ,who-chased him when scouting. He was held until after the surrender-sometimes, he alleges, on starvation rations. After his release he went to Cincinnati, where he remained about seventeen months, and then returned to his old home in Carroll county. Mr. Tolbert was married Dec. 19, 1866, to Miss Elizabeth V., daughter of Valentine Mc. and Elizabeth (Rice) Hodgson, of English descent. Six children have blessed their marriage-Thomas W., Elizabeth H., wife of Lyman Stutts; Minnie R, and Elba, living, and Abby' Estelle and Montra May, deceased. After marriage Mr. Tolbert went to farming, ­supplementing it- with trading in stock, prospering beyond his most sanguine expectations He is now one of the most substantial and ranks among the best citizens in Carroll county. Mr. Tolbert's success illustrates the great possibilities of life in Georgia when pluck and perseverance are coupled with energy and fair business judgment. Financially and socially himself and family occupy first-class positions. Himself and wife are members of the Presbyterian church.Return to Top


HENRY M. WILLIAMS, physician and surgeon, Bowdon, Carroll Co., Ga.,son of John B. and Mary (Strother) Williams, was born in Meriwether county, Ga., Aug. 5, 1834- His great-grandfather was a native of Ireland and came to America about the middle of the last century and settled in Virginia. His grandparents, Samuel and Susan Williams, were born in Virginia, migrated thence to South Carolina, and from there they removed, in 1805, to Georgia and settled in Jones county-moving, as was the fashion and the necessity in those days, in ox-carts. Dr. Williams' father was born in 1800 in Edgefield district, S. c., and came with the family to Georgia in 1805. When growing up he only received six months' schooling, but learned a great deal at home by studying by the light of a pine-knot firelight at night. His lifetime pursuit was that of a farmer, and from choice and necessity he was his own blacksmith, wood-worker, and shoemaker. He removed to and settled in Meri­wether county in 1825, where he made himself a good farm and a comfortable home. He was a Primitive Baptist in religion, and in forty years' preaching gained an enviable local reputation. It was his custom on preaching day to carry his shoes with him to the field, where he would work until the last minute, then take his shoes in his hand and go bare-footed until he crossed the last branch, when he would wash his feet, put on his shoes, and go to the church and preach.  Returning, he would remove his shoes and walk home bare-footed. Dr. Williams maternal grandfather, John Strother, was a native Georgian. Dr. Williams was reared and attended school at Rocky Mount, in Meriwether county. The school was of the "regulation" order of architecture of the period-log house, dirt floor, split-log seats, stick and mud chimney, and square apertures cut through the sides for windows. In 1858 he began the study of medicine, Dr. M. H. Westbrook being his preceptor, and in 1859 he entered the medical college at Nashville, Tenn., attended one course, and commenced the practice. In 1861 he enlisted in Company F (Capt. L Curtis), Nineteenth Georgia regiment (Col. W. W. Boyd Colquitt's brigade. He was in many battles, notably Seven Pines and the seven days fight around Richmond. At the last-named fight he was wounded on the first day and was off duty for ninety days, but immediately on his recovery he returned to his command and participated in the battles of Bunker Hill and Chancellorsville and was afterward. with Gen. Colquitt in Florida in the battle of Olustee, where he was again wounded, this time in the left leg, and disabled for active service.  He however, entered the state militia, with which he remained until the surrender.  After that he went to Alabama, where he remained a year and then came to Bowdon and located and established himself in his profession – under license.  In 1874 he was graduated from Atlanta Medical college.  He has continued in the practice at Bowdon, where he has established a fine reputation and secured a large and remunerative practice.  He is the leading physician and the highest medical authority in that locality.  Dr. Williams was happily married in 1869 to Miss Cora Hight – born and reared in Carroll County- daughter of William Be and Mary (Tolbert) Hight.  Mr. Hight was a pioneer, a farmer, and a leading merchant.  This union has been blessed with eight children:  Anna, Nora, Paul, Ernest, Ida, Jonnie, Willie and Manzie.  Dr. Williams is a royal arch Mason, and himself and wife are members of the Baptist church. Anna, Nora and Ernest are members of the Baptist church.Return to Top


JASPER J. WILLIAMSON, a wealthy and prominent citizen of Carrollton,Carroll Co., Ga., son of. Robert and Matilda (Goggens) Williamson, was born in South Carolina in 1838. His grandfather, John Williamspn, was born in South Carolina  in 179l:_and was a soldier in the war of 1812-14. His maternal grandfather, James Goggens, was also a South Carolinian. His father came from South Carolina to Georgia in 1850, bringing all he had in a four-horse wagon and a one-horse cart, laid his claim and settled in Coweta county. In 1854 he removed to Carroll county and settled four miles west of Carrollton. 

. Mr. Williamson was twelve years old when his father came to Georgia, and received such an education as could be imparted by a plain teacher in a dirt floor log cabin, with openings cut in the logs to let the light in and furnished with puncheon seats. He walked three miles to school and. attended only in the intervals between working the crops. After his graduation he taught school himself a while. In 1861 he enlisted in Company K (Capt. J. D. Calhoun), Eighteenth Alabama regiment (Col. Bullock), and was assigned to Gen. Gladden's command. He was in several hard-fought battles, among them Shiloh and Chicka­mauga, where he was wounded. He was captured at Marietta, Ga., and sent to Camp Douglas, Ill., and held a prisoner until after the surrender. After the war he returned to Alabama, where he lived and farmed for three years, when he -moved to Carroll county and conducted his plantation until 1886; then he removed to Carrollton to enjoy his ample income and the social advantages of town life. He has a fine plantation and two large brick business houses in Carrollton. In 1866 Mr. Williamson was married to Miss Julia A., daughter of Louis and Nancy (Brown) Walker, by whom he has had one child-Nancy E. Mrs. Williamson is a member of the Methodist church. Mr. Williamson is a master Mason. Return to Top


 JOHN H. WORD, merchant, Bowdon, Carroll Co., Ga., son of John Bryson and Amelia (Sparks) Word, was born in Carroll county in 1836. His great-grand­father, Charles Word, was a revolutionary soldier and was killed in the battle of King's Mountain. His grandparents, William and Elizabeth (Bryson) Word were North Carolinians, and he was a soldier in the revolutionary army. His father was born in Surry county, N. c., Jan. I, 1 79/?, and his mother in Franklin county, Ga., June 15, 1803. He came to Georgia when a young man and settled in Franklin as a school-teacher and taught there for many years, many of the scholars coming as many as seven miles to school. Himself and wife were mar­ried July 22, 1819. In 1836 he removed to Carroll county, where he soon rose to considerable prominence and was elected a justice of the inferior court; and for many years was a justice of the peace. On one occasion he married a couple and a short time afterward they called on him to "unmarry" them. For many years he was a deacon of the Baptist church. Mr. Word's mother was a daughter of Elijah and Amelia Sparks, early settlers in the country near Atlanta.

Mr. Word was reared on the farm, which he made his home until he married. He received a good common-school education and taught school a short time. In 1861 he enlisted in Company B (Capt. Charles A. McDaniel), Cobb's legion, and partici­pated in many hard-fought battles-among them Dam No. I, Yorktown, seven days' fight around Richmond; concluding with Malvern Hill, etc. He     went to Maryland, but was too late for the Second Manassas. He was at the battle of South Mountain, Sept. 14, 1862, where he lost his left leg and was tak     en prisoner. Only four of his company escaped death or wounds.  A month elapsed before his leg was amputated. After it was done he was struck by lightning, and then he had to submit to a second amputation.  In 1863 he was elected clerk of the superior court and served two years and was made a notary public and filled the office six years at Bowdon. In the meantime he began a general merchandise business at Bowdon, and although he had  but very small capital he has been eminently successful. He made his first start in business before the war closed but some Federal troops passed that way, took everything he had and broke him up. 

In 1884 he was elected to represent the county in the general assembly and served one term. In 1893 he was elected county commissioner of Carro1l county and took an active and prominent part in building the new court house. In 1866 Mr. Word was married to Miss Virginia, daughter of William and Ann (Stringer) Colquitt, South Carolian born. Mr. Colquitt was a soldier in the Confederate army during the war and a part of the time was a guard at the Andersonville prison. When he was married he and his wife began housekeeping with only a frying-pan and two old chairs, but they are better, and more comfortably, if not luxuriously, “fixed" now. Himself and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist church. He a liberal contributor to all worthy enterprises.Return to Top


BONNER, REV. JOHN          File contributed by  Kenny Shackleford
John Bonner, son of Zadock Bonner and Susan Johnson, was born in Fayette County, Georgia February 17, 1817.  His family had moved to Carroll County, Georgia after the land lottery held in the state capital at Milledgeville in 1827. The Creek Indians were ordered to give up their land by September 1, 1826. John was married three times.

   The first marriage of John was to Martha M. Gillisipe, daughter of James Gillisipe and Frances Patterson. She was possibly born in Georgia November 15, 1815. They were married in Carrollton, the newly formed County Seat of Carroll County, Georgia, November 13, 1835. John, a Methodist Minister, founded the Old Camp United Methodist Church (See Photo) in Carrolton during his marriage to Martha Gillisipe. Martha died in Carroll County, Georgia March 09, 1857. Where she may be buried is unknown. It is possible that she could be buried at the Old Camp Cemetery or at the Bonner Cemetery on Goldmine Road near Carrolton. Nine children were born to John Bonner and Martha Gillisipe.

   John's second wife was Martha Ann (Mattie) Upchurch, daughter of Thomas Gay Upchurch and Patience Barnes. Martha was born in Henry County, Georgia during May 1833. They were married in Carroll County September 03, 1857.

John Bonner and Martha Ann (Mattie) Upchurch are listed in the 1870 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia and are living in the Township of Carrollton. John is listed at age 53, born in Georgia. His occupation is listed as a farmer, owning 3200 acres of land.  In this census he is listed with his wife Martha Upchurch, 35 years of age and born in Georgia. The children listed in the household are; Martha Jane, age 26; James Lafayette, age 17; Thomas Jefferson, age 15; (children of his wife Martha Gillispie). Also listed are Zadock Gay, listed as age 13, (should be 10); Jerusha, age 11; Mary A., (listed as Mary E.) age 7; Josephine, age 5; Georgia P., age 3 and Charlie W., age 1, children of his wife Martha Upchurch. Also living in the home with them is Jimmy Shackelford, age 15, listed as domestic servant, born in Georgia. John Bonner's daughter Jerusha later married John Shackelford, born 1854. Who this Jimmy Shackelford could be is unknown. It is not John as he was still at home with is parents in 1870.

   In the 1880 Federal Census for Carroll County, Georgia John is listed as 64 years of age. Martha A. (Martha Upchurch) is listed at age 47. The children listed in the household are;  Zadock Gay (spelled Yadoe G in the census), age 19; Josephine M., age 14; Georgia P. (spelled Gunia P in the census), age 13; Charles W., age 10; Robert L., age 8; Lovick Smith (spelled Loviet in the census), and Rhoda L (spelled Roda in the census), age 4. All of the children were from his second marriage to Martha Upchurch and were born in Georgia.

 

   Martha Upchurch-Bonner died of pneumonia in Carroll County, Georgia January 13, 1881 and was buried at the Old Camp United Methodist Church Cemetery in Carroll County. (See right Photo) A total of 11 children were born to the union of John and Martha Upchurch-Bonner.

   John married for a third time in Atlanta, Fulton County, Georgia August 07, 1881 to Lucy J. Wood, daughter of Jesse and Helena Wood. She was born in South Carolina, County unknown August 01, 1844. John had been an elected member of the Georgia Legislature from Carroll County and served in that capacity from 1882 through 1883. This may have been the way he came into contact with Lucy and why they were married in Atlanta instead of Carrolton. Three children are known to have been born to the union of John and Lucy.

    John Thomas Bonner died in Carroll County, Georgia August 24, 1893 and was buried in the Old Camp United Methodist Church Cemetery in Carroll County. (See Left  Photo) Following is his obituary:

 

Obituary of John Bonner

 

The Carroll Free Press, Carrollton, Georgia, September 01, 1893

 

Hon. John Bonner Dead-

   After a long illness the Hon. John Bonner died at his home in the Kansas District on Thursday evening of last week. At one time during his sickness he partially recovered and was able to come to town, but taking a backset he gradually failed till the end came.

   The deceased was a prominent citizen of the County and was well known. Several years ago he represented the County in the Legislature and for a number of years he was County Commissioner.

   He was a man of considerable means which he had accumulated by industry and frugality. He was noted for his hospitality and kindness. He could not do too much for those who were his guests and many will ever remember the gracious kindness with which they were treated when under his roof.

   He was at the time of his death about seventy-six years of age. Up to the last illness he was quite active and gave promise of living many years.

   The remains of the deceased were interred at the Old Camp Ground near here and many friends and relatives were present to witness the last rites. The funeral exercises were conducted by the Rev. Mr. Crow.

   To the relatives of the deceased many friends extend their condolences.

 

   Lucy is listed in the 1900 Federal Census living in the 649 Militia District. Lucy is listed as Lucy J., age 55, born August 1845 in Georgia. (From the 1880 Census of Lucy Wood and her family who were living in Fulton County, Georgia she is listed as being born in South Carolina and not Georgia) The three children listed are; Lucy H., age 17 born July 1882; Nora E., age 15 born September 1884 and Allie L., age 13, born September 1886. The three children were born in Georgia. When the 1910 Federal Census, Carroll County, Georgia was taken Lucy J. Bonner, widow of John Thomas Bonner, was living in the Community of Temple in Carroll County, Georgia. She is listed as 65 years of age. The only child remaining at home is her daughter Allie who is listed as 23 years of age.

   Lucy J. Bonner is still living when the 1920 Federal Census of Carroll County, Georgia was taken. She is listed as 75 years of age, in the home of her daughter Nora who is married to Lucius E. Kenny. Finally in the 1930 Federal Census for Bibb County, Georgia Lucy is living in the City of Macon. She is listed as 85 years of age, living with her daughter Allie who is married to Howard E. Terry.

   Lucy died in Macon, Bibb County April 14, 1935. The location of her burial is unknown.

 

   John Bonner was regarded as one of Carroll County's most successful men, owning at least 3200 acres of land at one point, a mill and a ginnery. They were located some two miles east of Bonner's Gold Mine, which was owned by his brother, Zaddock Bonner, JR.  

   Not only was John a member of the Georgia Legislature he was frequently elected to the Board of County Commissioners of Carroll County, Georgia as well. His name is on a coner stone of the Carroll County Courthouse as one of Carroll Countys' most renowned citizens. He fathered 27 children.

 

Following is the Will of John Bonner

 

Last Will and Testament

of

John Bonner

 

Georgia Carroll County:

 

In the name of God Amen:

 

I, John Bonner, being of sound mind and disposing memory, but being old and knowing it is appointed unto man once to die, do make declare and publish this my last will and testament; hereby revoking all others heretofor made.

 

Item 1. My Soul I commit unto the hands of God who gave it, trusting and believing in his name alone for Salvation.

 

Item 2. I desire that my body be given simply a decent Christian Burial.

 

Item 3. I will that my executors pay all my just debts, as soon as possible after my death.

 

Item 4. I will and bequeath to my beloved wife Lucy J. Bonner, Lots of land (Nos. Two Hundred and Eighty Two and Two hundred and Eight Three, Seventh District Carroll County Ga.) containing four hundred and five acres, more or less, to have and to hold during her natural life. My Said wife furnished Thirty one hundred dollars of the purchase money for the same, and the deed was made to me alone.

 

Item 5. I also will and bequeath to my Said wife during her natural life, a one half interest in the rents & prophets in the Grist Mill and Gin and machinery, the said being located on the creek and run by water. I also give to my Said wife Lucy J. one buggy or carriage to be selected by her out of any I may have. One two horse wagon, and a one horse wagon, one good horse, one good mule, two good cows & calves, all the hogs, farming tools, all household and kitchen furniture (except as hereinafter provided) all crops of corn, cotton or produce of any kind that may be on the place where we live at the time of my death, to have and dispose of in any way She may see proper for the support and maintenance of herself and our three minor children, to wit: Lucy H., Nora E. and Lula A.

 

Item 6. I hereby constitute and appoint any Said wife guardian of the person and property of our Said minor children with full power to act for them and for their interest in all things, and it shall not be necessary for her to give any Bond or make any returns of her actings and doings as I have full confidence in her judgement as well as her rectitude.

 

Item 7. I will and direct that on the death of my Said wife Lucy J. the land bequeathed to her in item (4) four and such personal property of all kinds as may remain on the place, be sold by my executors, and the proceeds divided equally between the three children of my Said wife and myself. I have given Charles W. a one half interest in the Mill and machinery on the creek and I give to him the other half at the death of my wife.

 

Item 8. I desire to do and equal part as near as I can with all my children and I think I am the best judge of it. After carefully considering the whole matter I have decided to make some special bequeaths to make it right in my estimation and I do so as follows.

 

Item 9. I give and bequeath to my daughter Rhoda E. the S.W. Fourth of lot of land No. Two Hundred and Eighty in the Seventh District Carroll Co. Ga. Also one horse and Saddle worth one hundred dollars, or its value in money, as She may elect, - Also, the organ now at my house, - Also cash one hundred dollars, - Also two feather beds with necessary bedding, and one cook Stove and one sewing machine, or their value in money.

 

Item 10. I give and bequeath to my Son Robert L. Bonner, The N.W. Fourth of land No. Two Hundred and Eighty in the Seventh Dist. Carroll County Ga. - Also one hundred dollars in money, - Also the horse I have already given him valued at one hundred dollars, One feather bed and necessary bedding and fifty dollars in provisions or money in lieu of it.

 

Item 11. I give and bequeath to Lovett S. Bonner my Son, the N.E. Fourth of Lot of land No. Two Hundred and Eighty in the Seventh District Carroll County Ga. Also one horse and Saddle worth one hundred dollars, or that amount in lieu of it. Also one hundred dollars in cash, one feather bed with necessary bedding and fifty dollars in money or provisions.

 

Item 12. I give and bequeath to my daughter Georgia Pentecost one hundred and fifty dollars in addition to what she has already had.

 

Item 13. I give and bequeath to my daughter Josephine Hulsey one hundred dollars in addition to what I have already given her.

 

Item 14. I give and bequeath to my grandchildren (W.Z. Barkers) to wit; Ida Smith, John Barker, George Barker, Emma Barker, .. Winder and to John Barker, for Lou Barker Eighty dollars each.

 

Item 15. I give and bequeath to Mrs. Jeanie McClendon for my two great Granddaughters Georgia Barker and Sammie Barker, children of Bonner Barker, Eighty dollars to be equally divided between Said great Granddaughters.

 

Item 16. I give and bequeath to my daughter Francis M. Hunter, in addition to what I have already given her, twenty five dollars ($25.00) a year to be paid to her at the first of each year by my Executors during her lifetime. - Should She die before my estate is wound up, I will and direct that her children be paid her equal distribution Share of my estate, whatever it may be.

 

Item 17. In the distribution of my estate I direct that my grandchildren of W.Z. Barker or (any other of my Grandchildren whose parents my be dead) Shall get such share as their parent if living would get under this Will, and that the children of such deceased parents receive equal parts of said share, - Share and share alike. Should any of my children die, having no child or children or wife, the Share of such child is to revert to my estate.

 

Item 18. I want to be equal with all my children, I have given some of them more than others, I wish to settle that matter myself, so that there may be no dispute among them as to what my intentions are. While some of them owe me considerable amounts, I shall not require them to account to my estate for it unless they make it necessary by claiming Settlement themselves. I do not desire to charge my son James Lafayette with the excess in my farm of perhaps one thousand dollars on our accounts and dealings, but if he continues The Suit now pending and should get a judgement against my or any estate, the amount of said judgment whatever it my be, is to be charged against him in the distribution of my estate, and he is to get no distribution share, till this is satisfied by him.

 

Item 19. After the special bequests herein named, and my debts, and the expenses of Administration are all paid, I will and direct that my Executors make an equal division of all that my be left of my estate, between my beloved wife Lucy J. Bonner and all my children, that is to say each child shall receive an equal share and my said wife shall get a childs part, which share together with the bequeaths made to her, shall be in full of her share of my estate, and in full satisfaction of Dower, years support, or any other claims against my estate.

 

Item 20. Of course before any such distribution can be made, it will be necessary for my Executors to sell and dispose of my estate. I therefore direct that they have full power so to do, either at public or private sale, and it shall not be necessary for them to get any order of Court for this purpose. (They are first to sell all Gins and machinery of every kind at once after my death, except the water Mill, Gin, and machinery referred to on the creek, in which my wife has a lifetime interest). As soon after my death as my Executors think best, I want them to sell, either at Public or private sale as in their judgement may seem best, all the property of which I may die possessed, of every kind both real and personal, and convert the same into money, except such property as is herein especially disposed of, and shall make returns of said sales to the Ordinary, so that all parties interested may see just what is done. And no order of Court shall be necessary to authorize said sale or sales, and no other returns shall be necessary, except that the receipts are vouchers which are received for the amounts paid out, shall be returned in final return. I believe my Executors are honest and will do right, and I want as little machinery and expenses in winding up my estate as possible.

 

Item 21. I hereby appoint my son W.S. Bonner, my Son-in-law John Pentecost and my beloved wife Lucy J. Bonner as Executors of this my last will and testament.

 

Item 22. Having full confidence in the integrity Shill and ability of my friend G.W. Merrell Esq.- I hereby direct that he be retained by Executors as Attorney, to see that this my will is carried out, and to give advice generally, and to assist in any litigation that may arise in which my Estate may be concerned or interested.

 

This 1st of April 1893. John Bonner

 

Signed declared and published by John Bonner as his Last will and testament, in the presence of us the Subscribers, who subscribed our names hereto in the presence of Said Testator, John Bonner and at his special instances and request, and in the presence of each other, he signing in our presence and we signing in his presence. The words, "Together with my interest in the Water Mill and Gin on the Creek and other machinery", on page 3

 

April 1st 1893

 

J.F. Sale; J.T. Freeman; R.H. Fits; G.W. Merrell; Georgia Carroll County,

 

We W.F. Sale, J.T. Freeman, R.H. Fitts and G.W. Murrell do Swear that we saw the within named John Bonner sign and publish the within proper as his Last Will and Testament. That we Subscribed the same as witnesses thereto at the special instance and request of the said John Bonner, and in his presence: That the said John Bonner signed the same freely and voluntarily, and was at the time of such signing of sound and disposing mind and memory.

 

J.T. Sale; G.W. Merrell; J.T. Freeman; R.H. Fitts

 

Sworn to and subscribed before me Nov 30th 1893

S.J. Brown Ordinary

 

Georgia, Carroll County: We Lucy J. Bonner, W.S. Bonner and J.W. Pentecost do Solemonly swear that this writing contains the true and Last Will of the within named. John Bonner deceased, so far as we know or believe, and shall we will well and truly execute the same in accordance with the laws of the State, - So help us God.

 

Lucy J. Bonner W.S. Bonner J.W. Pentecost

Sworn to and subscribed before me Nov 30th 1893

S.J. Brown Ordinary

Filed in office Aug 30th 1893

 

 

Parents of Martha Ann (Mattie) Upchurch

 

   Thomas Gay Upchurch was born in North Carolina during 1779. He married in Henry County, Georgia January 06, 1825 to Patience Barnes. She was born in North Carolina during 1804. Thomas Gay was one of the original planners for the lay out for the town of Bowdon, Carroll County, Georgia. It is believed they both died in Carroll County.    Return to Top

 


 

 

 

 

 

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