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Camp Recovery
Complete

Submitted by: Denise Smiley - Email: dsmiley509@alltel.net


Inside the visitor's building there is a picture frame that has the following article along with pictures of the site:

CAMP RECOVERY

The Camp Recovery monument marks the site of the burial of as many as 40 United States soldiers
who died during the Indian Wars of 1817 to 1821.

Troops of the 4th and 7th Calvary occupied Fort Scott, across the Flint River, along with Tennessee and Kentucky militiamen, who came there with General Andrew Jackson for his march through Spanish Florida in 1818. Many of the men became sick with fever and a camp was set up on high ground, east of the river, in the hope that removing them from the low river swamp would help them get well. This camp was called Camp Recovery, and although many did recover; historians say that as many as 40 are buried there where they died.

In 1882 a monument was erected in memory of these soldiers who died in this campaign. A 32-pound cannon barrel was mounted upright on a four-foot square monolith base of granite and a cannonball of larger diameter was placed on top. The cannonball has long since been carried away, but, in 1971, N. L. Sellars, who previously owned the property, with the help of his sons Howard and Glenn and grandson Scotty Lewis, erected a gate to the site with two brick columns and a steel arch over the entrance with letters identifying Camp Recovery. They also fenced off a lane from the highway to the cemetery site and built there a small block building with a red tile roof, in memory of the fallen troops who died over 40 years before the Civil War.

Camp Recovery was passed from N. L. Sellars to his daughter Olivia (Libby) Sellars Goodwin in 1988. After her death in 2003, it was passed on to her family. It is currently owned by her husband Charles Goodwin, her children Libbie Denise Goodwin Fletcher and Charles R. (Chuck) Goodwin.

Visitors are always welcome to view the site.

Headstone Picture


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CAMP RECOVERY ENTRANCE SIGN



CampRecovery_01.jpg (386 x 290) 48KB

CAMP RECOVERY
This medical camp was established on September 15, 1820 by the Southeastern Army of the United States headquartered at Fort Scott. It was used as a recuperation area for soldiers who had contracted malaria and dysentery in the swampy environs of the fort. Soldiers considered the fort to be the deadliest military assignment in the country because of numerous illnesses and deaths there. The camp was located on a high ridge three miles southeast of Fort Scott. A 34-pound cannon marks the site of the camp and nearby cemetery for the soldiers who perished here.



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VISITOR'S BUILDING



CampRecovery_02.jpg (457 x 305) 46KB

VISITOR'S BUILDING



CampRecovery_05.jpg (224 x 299) 28KB

CANNON MONUMENT



CampRecovery_03.jpg (438 x 293) 44KB

INSCRIPTION ON CANNON MONUMENT
ERECTED ON THE SITE OF CAMP RECOVERY NEAR WHICH ARE BURIED OFFICERS AND SOLDIERS OF THE UNITED STATES ARMY WHO DIED DURING THE INDIAN WARS IN THE FLINT RIVER AND CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER COUNTRIES.
1817 TO 1821


Copyright 2008 Decatur County Coordinator
Denise Smiley


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