Historic Photos

 

Floyd County GAGenWeb

 

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Photos shown below from Georgia Archives Virtual Vault

Masonic Temple

Espy Family in front of

their home about 1890

Steamboat Etowah Bill,

ca 1884

Steamboat J J Seay landing at Etowah and Oostanaula rivers, 1840-1869

South Rome Bridge, over Etowah River before 1885

1864 Etowah, Oostanaula and Coosa Rivers

Boats, Floyd County,

unknown date.

Floyd County East Tennessee depot

Courthouse 1800s

Employees of Lindale Cloth, ca 1890-1893

Floyd County's first

courthouse, Livingston, 1833

Jessie Connor McCollister

Cave Spring, ca 1900-1915

Home of John Rush, ca 1870-1899

J A and Naomi Shopshire Bale family and

home ca 1882-1883

Lee Ella Smith Sparks,

Rome ca 1895

Oldest brick building in Rome

The Sidney Smith,

ca 1870

Men on Broad Street,

Rome, ca 1890

Steamboat, Floyd Co

 

Unknown person.

If you know who the

person is please advise.

Submitted by Nancie Whitfield

Unknown person.

If you know who the

person is please advise.

Submitted by Nancie Whitfield

 

Unknown person.

If you know who the

person is please advise.

Submitted by Nancie Whitfield

 

Unknown person.

If you know who the

person is please advise.

Submitted by Nancie Whitfield

 

GA School for the Deaf. In 1833, a deaf man, John Jacobus Flournoy, of Jackson County, great grandson of Jacob Flournoy, a French Huguenot, urging education for the deaf, interested Governor Wilson Lumpkin and the Georgia Legislature in this educational movement. At first the pupils, few in number, were sent to the American Asylum for the Deaf and Dumb in Hartford. Conn. Distance, weather, and the youth of the pupils made that unsatisfactory. On May 15, 1846, with four pupils in a log cabin, with O. P. Fannin, teacher, this school began as a part of the Hearn Manual School at Cave Spring, Georgia. This school grew rapidly and, in 1847, a brick building was erected and dedicated. Later, other additions were made. The school was closed during the War Between the States and used as a hospital by both Confederate and Union forces. It resumed operations in February 1867 and is still supported by the State of Georgia. In 1955, this school had 82 teachers and employees and an income of more than $500,000.  Submitted by Sharlyn Shaw

Rollie Marlin

Flood in Rome, date unknown

   
   
   
   
   

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