Biographies

Including family notes, letters & memorabilia, oral histories and genealogy reports.

Biography Submitted by:
BEARD, William Watson

Charlotte Collins Bond

BEARD/PHILLIPS ~ Correspondence Charlotte Collins Bond
BULLOCK, R. H.

Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles

CARRINGTON, Rev. Timothy

Diane Carrington Bradford

COLBERT, James F. Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles
COLLINS, Charles T Charlotte Collins Bond
CRUMLEY Family Christine Crumley Brown
DANIEL, General Allen Charlotte Collins Bond
DANIEL, George C.  Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles
DEAN ~ Correspondence  
DEAN ~ Correspondence  
DUDLEY ~ Correspondence  
DUDLEY/STEPHENSON ~ Correspondence
EASON ~ Correspondence  
EBERHART, J. B. Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles
EBERHART, Dr. J. G. Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles
EVANS Family Shirley Burks Wells
FORBES, John McEver Charlotte Collins Bond
HALL, Jeremiah Charlotte Collins Bond
HALL ~ Correspondence  
GUNNELLS, John R.  Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles
LONG, Crawford W. Jeanne Arguelles
MAY Family

Charlotte Collins Bond

MEADOW, David W. Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles
MOORE, John N.  Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles
MOORE brothers of NE Georgia Ron Jones
MOORE - descendants of Thomas Moore Ron Jones
MOORE ~ Diary of Isaac Vaughn Moore  
NISBIT, Eugenius A. Joy Fisher
O'KELLEY, George Wilburn Charlotte Collins Bond
PORTERFIELD Charlotte Collins Bond
POWER, S. P.  Mary Love Berryman & Jeanne Arguelles
ROGERS/SMITH ~ Correspondence  
ROGERS Family Outline

Sylvia Brooks

ROGERS Family Notes

Sylvia Brooks

ROGERS, HAWKS, HARDMAN notes

Sylvia Brooks

SARTAIN ~ Correspondence Charlotte Collins Bond
SARTAIN ~ Bios Charlotte Collins Bond
SCARBOROUGH - Correspondence  
SCARBOROUGH - Oral History  
SCOTT, W. W.  Carla Miles
SEGAR, Frank - Poem Charlotte Collins Bond
SMITH ~ Correspondence  
STEPHENS ~ William C. Stephens Letters  
STRICKLAND Family Story Charlotte Collins Bond
STRICKLAND Family Leatha A. Betts
STRICKLAND, John J. Joy Fisher
STRICKLAND, William Charlotte Collins Bond
TEATE, Linnie - Ancestry Charlotte Collins Bond
THOMPSON, Dr. B. M. Carla Miles
Vanishing Madison County Stories of the Creek and Cherokee Indians in Madison County Charlotte Collins Bond
VEAL ~ Correspondence  
WHITE, J. F.  Carla Miles

 


R. H. BULLOCK, farmer, Danielsville, Madison Co., Ga., was born in Oglethorpe county in 1810, and is now one of the oldest residents of this county. This branch of the family descended from an Englishman and one of the early settlers of Virginia Nathaniel Bullock, the grandfather of the subject of this memoir, was born in North Carolina, and marrying Mary Hawkins, moved to Georgia during the time of the revolutionary war. A son, Hawkins Bullock, entered in the patriot ranks at the age of sixteen years under Capt. Twitty and in Gen. Greene's command. He was born in North Carolina, and after the war of independence abdcated in Wilkes county, Ga. and subsequently moved to Madison county, where be died. He married Frances IL Gordon, a daughter of Capt. Alexander Gordon. Mr. Gordon was a revolutionary soldier and attained the rank of captain, moved to Wilkes county soon after the war, and later to Oglehorpe county where he died. Mr. R. H. Bullock was a farmer from youth, and in 1836 was mamed to Mary H. Griffith, daughter of James Griffith, a native and life-long resident of Madison county. They have three children: Sarah F., James H. and Wyatt H. The mother of the children was born in Madison county in 1817 and died in 1849. In 1865 he married Lucinda Thompson, daughter of Nathaniel Gholston, an early settler of Madison county and a native of North Carolina. To this union have been born the following living children: Susan, Georgia A., Mary L., Lula S., Richard H., Bonnie G. and Nathaniel. The mother was born in Madison county in 1837. Mr. and Mrs. Bullock are members of the Presbyterian church. Mr. Bullock has been active in politics during his long life, and has been frequently asked to hold official positions. He was elected clerk of the inferior court, then a member of the court and then served as ordinary for twenty years. He was a member of the legislature when the capital was at Milledgeville for four terms, and for four years represented his district in the state senate at Atlanta. Mr. Bullock is familiarly known as Major, this title being bestowed on him in youth, when he was major in the state militia and fighting Mr. King George's men. He owns a fine farm near Danielsville and a big mill on the South Broad river, and is more than comfortably fixed in this world's goods. Though way up in years Mr. Bullock still enjoys good health and possesses a powerful intellect, which is still as active as ever.
"Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


JAMES F. COLBERT, farmer, Danielsville, was born in Madison county in 1839. About the beginning of this century Philip Colbert, a son of a Virginia planter, with his wife, Sarah Garr, came to Georgia and located on a farm in Oglethorpe county. His son, S. W. Colbert, was born there, arid on reaching manhood, moved to Madison county about 1838. Here he wedded Margaret, a daughter of James and Jane (Thompson) Kurt. Mr. Nutt was born in South Carolina, and was a hatter by trade. Finding no employment in that line, he turned to farming for a vocation, and moved to Georgia and settled on a tract of land in Madison county. Mr. S. W. Colbert represented Madison county in the legislature for several tern1s, and is a well-known figure in the history of tl1e county for the first twenty-five years of its existence. He died on his farm. Mr. James F. Colbert was a farmer boy, but was given an excellent education, considering the educational advantages then afforded, and in 1861, responding to the bugle call for volunteers, joined Company E, Thirty-ninth Georgia regiment, under Capt. Ghaston. In 1864 he married M. L. Arnold, daughter of Hugh and Nancy (Fambrough) Arnold. The father was a native of Madison county, but late in life moved to Coweta county, where he died. Mr. and Mrs. Colbert have three children: Earl A., India and Ouida. The mother of the children was born in Coweta county in 1856. She is an active member of the Congregational church. Mr. Colbert has been fortunate in his business and farming, and owns about 6,000 acres of valuable land, much of which is in cultivation; and, also, has a large amount of personal property. He is highly respected for his integrity and honest, industrious, upright character. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


GEORGE C. DANIEL, ordinary of Madison county, was born in the same county in 1839, and was the son of James and Elizabeth B. (Jones) Daniel. Mr. James Daniel was a native of the same county, and a big farmer and political leader, representing Madison county in the legislature. He served as a captain in the war with the Creek Indians, and died in Madison in 1859. Mr. George C. Daniel's grandparents were Allen and Mary (Allen) Daniel, the father being born in Virginia, and was captain of the Eighth Virginia infantry in the revolutionary War. He was also general of the state militia, and after the war came to Georgia, where he became a leading citizen. He donated the site of the county public buildings of Madison county, and was one of the organizers of the courts. He represented it in the legislature, and at one time was sheriff of Elbert county. The mother of Mr. George C. Daniel was a daughter of James and Elizabeth Jones. Mr. Jones was a native of Franklin county, Ga., and died in Chattooga county. Mr. George C. Daniel spent his early days on the farm, and his education was picked up from reading and study after the day's labor was finished. In 1861 he enlisted in the late war, in Company K, Third Georgia regiment, under Capt. E. C. Billups, subsequently being commanded by David B. Langston, later by L. D. Mitchell. He fought in the battles of South mills, Malvern hill, second Manassas, Bristow's station, Sharpsburg, and, in the latter engagement, was wounded and sent to the hospital. He was sent home for three months and then returned to his command. He was then detached for hospital duty. In 1859 Mr. Daniel began to read medicine under Dr. Long, and then took a course of lectures at Philadelphia, and was graduated during his service in the hospital. After receiving his diploma he was commissioned assistant surgeon in the Confederate navy, being assigned to his duty on the ironclad "Chicora," and remained there until Charleston was evacuated. He marched from Charleston to Raleigh, thence to Drury Bluff, where he did his last service. In 1865 he married Louisa E. Watson, daughter of Samuel and Harriet (Jones) Watson. Mr. Watson was a native of South Carolina and moved to Jefferson, Jackson Co., Ga., where he died. They have had born to them several children, of whom three are living: Clara, James D., Charles Y. The mother of the children was born in Jackson county, Ga., in 1844. Husband and wife are earnest workers in the Presbyterian church, and Mr. Daniel is a Mason. In 1865, Mr. Daniel began the practice of medicine in Madison county and continued until 1873, when he as elected ordinary, and re-elected every term since. After returning from the war Mr. Daniel was obliged to begin life over again, but with untiring energy he has succeeded in getting together considerable property, and is a prosperous citizen. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


J. B. EBERHARDT, farmer, is a native of Madison county, was born in 1841, and is the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (Wynn) Eberhardt. Jacob Eberhardt was born in what is now Madison county, in 1797, and was a distinguished man of his day. He was a prosperous farmer, and was state senator from Oglethorpe county and Madison county about 1850. He died on his farm in 1862. He was a son of George and Margaret (Patten) Eberhardt. George Eberhardt was a son of Jacob Eberhardt, who came to America from Germany in 1745 and settled in Georgia, where he died. Jacob Eberhardt, the second, married Elizabeth, daughter of John and Elizabeth. Wynn, old residents of Madison county. Mr. J. B. Eberhardt was given a good education, and in 1862 joined Company E, Thirty-seventh Georgia regiment, under Capt. Gholston, who was killed at Jonesborough. Mr. Eberhardt was then made captain, and led his company in the battles of Missionary ridge, where he was distinguished for his bravery. He was wounded at Jonesborough. In 1864, while in service, he married Lusetta Goolsby, daughter of T. B. and Martha Goolsby. The Goolsbys were from Oglethorpe county, and rvlrs. Eberhardt was born in 1844. Mr. J. B. Eberhardt and wife have seven living children: L. Ho, Dr. Pope Clifford, Lizzie, Mattie, Robert T., Alexander H. Mr. and Mrs. Eberhardt are members of the Baptist church, and he is a royal arch Mason. Mr. Eberhardt is a self-made man, starting in life as a poor boy, and working with such industry and perseverance as to acquire a good farm of SOo acres, besides other valuable property. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


DR. J. G. EBERHART. The Eberhart family occupies a prominent position in the history of Georgia, and one of its leading representatives in Madison county is J. G. Eberhart, a physician of high standing and great professional skill. Dr. Eberhart's father was George Eberhart, a man distinguished in political and business annals of Madison county. He was born and reared in the county, and was an extensive farmer and large slave owner. He served in the late war, and was a justice of the inferior court, and was justice of the peace for a great many years. He was actively identified with the Baptist church, and died in 1887, lamented by a large circle of friends. George Eberhart married Sarah A. Griffith, daughter of James and Sarah (Leiper) Griffith. Dr. Eberhart's paternal grandparents were George and Katie Eberhart. George Eberhart was a North Carolinian, and settled on the land long before Madison county was organized. He died in 1848. In 1861 Dr. Eberhart enlisted for the war in Company E, Capt. Martin, Fifteenth Georgia regiment. He was in active service, and in the carnage at the battles of Murfreesboro and Black Grove. After the battle of Chickamauga, Dr. Eberhart was appointed hospital steward of the Fourth battalion, sharpshooters; and, after the battle of Missionary ridge, he was appointed acting assistant surgeon; and about the close of the war he was appointed by the division surgeon to receive and distribute the medicines to the different regiments in the brigade. He had chosen medicine as his profession early in life, and, after getting a primary training in the public schools, began studying for the profession, in 1857, under Dr. Willis Willingham. He attended one course of lectures at the medical college of Georgia, Augusta, and then went to a Philadelphia medical college, from which he secured his diploma in 1854. In 1856 he married Mildred M., daughter of David and Elizabeth (Snelling) Bell. The father was a native of Elbert county and resided there all his life. Mrs. Dr. Eberhart was born in 1837. Dr. Eberhart ranks among the leading physicians of his part of the state, and his professional skill and devotion to his avocation have brought him a large practice. He is a member of the masonic fraternity, and is a much-respected citizen of Madison county. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


JOHN R. GUNNELLS, farmer, was born in Oglethorpe county in 1837, and was the son of W. M. and Lydia N. (Thomas) Gunnells. W. M. Gunnells was a native of this county and was the son of John Gunnells, an early settler and a veteran of the war of 1812. W.M. Gunnells was a prosperous farmer and moved to Madison county in 1843. He was married to a daughter of Stephen and Margaret (Thomas) Thomas. The father was a native of Virginia and moved to Georgia, where he died. Mr. John R. Gunnells was brought up on the farm and his educational opportunities were limited to a few weeks of schooling in the winter and what his mind stored from reading the books of the scant libraries in the neighborhood. In 1862 he enlisted in the war, Company C, Seventh cavalry, under Capt. Burk, later Capt. Flint. He fought in many battles and was in the engagements at Petersburg, Burgess Mill, Gatlet's farm, Fort McCray, Bentonville, Columbia, Charleston, Orangeburg, C. H., Galesburg, Raleigh. In 1859 he married Mary E. Nelms, daughter of John and Fannie (Denney) Nelms. He was a native of Elbert county and engaged in farming and milling. Mrs. Gunnells was born in Elbert county in 1840, and died in 1864, leaving one child, James M. In 1866 Mr. Gunnells was married to Julia A., daughter of Harman and Amelia (Williams) ToIlet. Mr. ToIlet was a native of North Carolina, but moved to Georgia about the time of the birth of Mrs. Gunnells in 1830. Mr. and Mrs. Gunnells are members of the Baptist church and he has 10ng belonged to the I.O.O.F. M. Gunnells owns a fine farm and an excellent mill and gin. He is one of the substantial citizens of the county and lives in a nice home near Neese. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


Crawford W. Long

The Daily Constitution: Atlanta, GA
Friday Morning, August 29, 1879

Crawford W. Long
A Biographical Sketch of the World's Great Benefactor

Dr. Crawford W. Long, the now famous discoverer of surgical anaesthesia, was at the time of his death, June 16, 1879, sixty-three years old. He was born in Danielsville, Ga. November 1st, 1815. His father, James Long, came with his father, Captain Samuel Long, to Georgia with his family as a part of a colony of emigrants from Pennsylvania shortly after the revolution of 1776. Captain Long served throughout that eventful struggle; was at the battles of Germantown, Brandywine, and was in the forlorn hope, commanded by Lafayette, at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, which closed the War.
Captain Long was a man of great executive ability; immense driving power and practical intelligence -- a born leader and brave, patriotic, modest man, and gave his son James every advantage of education and culture then attainable in the country.
Mr. James Long, the father of Dr. Crawford W. Long, was also a man of great ability. He was a merchant and planter, but never ceased to be a student, the law having special attractions for him. He was so well up in the great principals of law and jurisprudence that in difficult cases he was consulted by lawyers and judges in the district in which he lived, and was in fact the most trusted and influential man in his district, and represented it in the state senate as long as he would consent to serve.
He was also an intimate friend, advisor and confidant of William H. Crawford, Georgia's greatest statesman, who was secretary of state, minister to France and a prominent candidate for the presidency, and was with him and held his hand when he died.
As an evidence of this attachment and friendship, Mr. James Long gave his eldest son the name of Crawford. This son when young was studious and mature far beyond his years. He entered college at so early an age that he was known as "the baby." Notwithstanding his youth he graduated with the second honor of his class, a large one, from Franklin College -- now the University of Georgia -- in 1835; studied medicine in the university of Pennsylvania and was graduated M.D. with high honors from that institution in 1839.
Dr. Long first practiced medicine for many years at Jefferson, Jackson county, where he made his experiments and perfected and demonstrated his great discovery of the anaesthetic properties of ether to annihilate pain under any and all cases of human suffering without endangering or destroying life, and thus conferring a blessing in every organized human being and animal doomed to the vicissitudes of life, and securing for himself a monument based on the individual gratitude of all who in coming time may be under the necessity of submitting to dental, surgical or other operations involving bodily anguish and pain.
Beside such a monument ever growing in all human hearts, renewed by every tooth-ache and amputation relieved of pain -- what are the pyramids what the Cleopatra needles whose builders are all forgotten and unknown? Even the great wall of China the burial monuments and cities now being unearthed, compare to the sublime monument ever perennial and ever growing in amplitude and elevation which this modest citizen and beneficent discoverer has almost unanimously won for his ever to be honored name.
After his graduation, Dr. Long was physician for one year in the New York City hospital. Being passionately fond of surgery and was so successful that he was recommended by the secretary of the navy to be surgeon to a national ship of war, a high honor in those days. He would have accepted this position but in deference to his father's wishes located and commenced the practice of his profession at Jefferson, Ga., where he performed many difficult and dangerous operations, chiefly the extraction of tumors and the removing of cancers, or other fungoid affections. In 1842 he married Miss Caroline Swain, only child of Geo. Swain, a planter, and brother of David L. Swain, L.L.D., governor of North Carolina, and president of the university of that state. More than forty years ago Governor Swain was a man of great weight and influence in his time and was a cousin of General Joe Lane, once a prominent candidate for the vice-presidency.
Dr. Long was devoted to his profession and often declared that it "was a holy mission," and said he had "no other or higher wish than to prove by his life and work that he was entitled to have placed on his tomb when life's fitful fever was over," "He was a benefactor of his kind." Although opposed, as was Mr. Stephens, to secession, he went with his state, and during the fratricidal struggle gave all the aid in his power to the south. When Athens was garrisoned by the United States troops after the war he was offered the position of surgeon by the great general and president of the reunited nation, but was unable to take the requisite oath and was commissioned on his merits to the position by Col. Blucher, who informed him that he "wanted no oath from him as his character for honor, truth and justice were well known and established." Dr. Long was ruined by the war and died struggling to meet engagements and to pay off debts created in New York and other northern cities before the war, in which he became involved unwisely for others. His sons are now his successors in the drug business at Athens, and have paid off over twelve thousand dollars on the whole amount of their noble father's obligations, which is the whole amount.
Dr. Long at his death left two sons and five daughters. The eldest, Miss Fannie, is a self-reliant and highly intelligent young lady, who was the confidant and private secretary of her father, and has all his papers and documents in her keeping, having promised her father that she would never cease her efforts to secure him a just recognition of his claims and services as the "discoverer of anaesthesia."
After her father's death she sought and received employment as a teacher of drawing and painting at Huntsville, Ala., where she soon returns to resume her work for honorable self-support. Miss Long visited New York and was present while the face of her father was being placed on the canvas by Mr. Carpenter, and there made the acquaintance of the promising artist and sculptor, Mr. W. R. O'Donovan, and many of the leading artists of the commercial metropolis. For this reason, and because she has great artistic perception and great executive ability, she has been suggested as a member of the committee to select the artist and decide on the position, whether sitting or standing, of the statue of her father; also, as to the material. Her idea being to have the statue to be placed in the national capitol to be executed in marble, and another duplicate in bronze to be placed in the grounds fronting the proposed new state capitol.
Mr. O'Donovan favors this idea, we are informed. A younger sister, Miss Emma M. Long, now seventeen, has displayed poetic ability, and promises to do honor to the great name she now bears.
Among the poor negro women this unpretending and devoted doctor was called "Dr. Savior: -- a touching tribute to his almost divine character and profession.
One reason why Dr. Long, while engaged in his experiments and operations with ether, during 1842 and 43, did not rush to the front, was the fact that a great excitement then prevailed in this country and in Europe in regard to mesmerism. Many doctors, and among them Dr. Gibbs, of Columbia, S.C., a high authority on yellow fever, and the subject of mesmerism, witnessed several operations on patients mesmerised, and declared that mesmerism was the ne plus ultra needed to kill pain in all surgical and powerful operations.
On leaving Jefferson, Dr. Long purchased a home and lived in Atlanta two years, when he sold out to Mr. Clarke Howell, the father of Senator E. P. Howell, editor of The Constitution. The house is now standing on Peachtree Street, adjoining Judge Ezzard.
~ H. L. Stuart


DAVID W. MEADOW, one of the leading lights of the bar of northeastern Georgia, was born in Madison county in 1852, and is a son of Berry J. and Elizabeth (Williford) Meadow. Mr. B. J. Meadow was born in Oglethorpe county and was a big land and slave-owner, and for years sheriff of Madison county. He was a strict observer of the teachings of the Baptist church and remained in Madison county until his death. He was married to Elizabeth Williford, of the Williford-King family, of Virginia, who took up their home in Georgia at an early day and lived in Madison county. The grandfather of Mr. D. W. Meadow was Isaac Meadow, the grandson of an Englishman who was the founder of the Meadow family in America, settling first in Virginia and afterward moving to Georgia. The great-grandfather, great-grandmother and two twin children were killed by the Indians soon after coming to Georgia. Mr. D. W. Meadow was born and grew to manhood on the farm. His father died when he was about two and one-half years old, leaving his mother and eight children. The war between the states left the family little but the old plantation. His widowed mother being then unable to give him the educational advantages desired young Meadow determined to educate himself. After working on the farm for several years, taking advantage of the village school in the meantime, he taught school, successfully making the means to attend the university of Georgia, from which he graduated in 1881. He then entered the law school of that institution, graduating there from in 1882. Of the college societies he was a member of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. Upon entering the university he became a member of the Phi Kappa Literary society and in three weeks thereafter was elected as a public debater on the spring debate. He was elected one of three champion debaters, receiving the highest vote, from the Phi Kappa society in 1881, and that society was at the debate at commencement successful over the Demosthenian society for the first time in five years. He has ever felt a deep interest in education, has served on the county board of education and is now and has been for some time a trustee of Danielsville academy. In 1886 he married Susie A., daughter of W. C. and Ella C. (Mitchell) Colbert. Mr. Colbert was born in Madison county and moved to Athens, where he became a prominent merchant. To Mr. and Mrs. Meadow have been born three children, two of whom are living, Hilda and Will King. The mother was born in Madison county in 1862 and is a sincere and active member of the Methodist church and a graduate of the famous Lucy Cobb institute, Athens, Ga. Mr. Meadow is a Mason and is at present worshipful master of the lodge in Danielsville. In 1894 he was elected to the legislature, being the first lawyer sent to that body from Madison county in forty years, there having been a deep-set prejudice against the profession. He at once took a prominent place among the law-makers of Georgia and was appointed to the important committees of general judiciary, finance, railroads, journals, penitentiary and various special committees, including those of the State Normal and Industrial college and the university. Mr. Meadow is a self-made man and one who can look over his honorable and prosperous career with pride, knowing his achievements are the result of his own efforts. His close application to his profession, his studious habits and fine mental attainments have established him a reputation among the courts of the state as one of the great lawyers of Georgia. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


JOHN N. MOORE, farmer, Comer, Madison county, first saw the light of day in Elbert county in 1836, and is the son of Capt. William and Elizabeth (Booth) Moore. Capt. Moore was a native of Elbert county and was a farmer by occupation. He served in the Indian war and died on the old home place in Elbert county. The grandfather of John N. Moore was a Virginian, was one of the first settlers of Elbert county, and a successful tiller of the soil. Elizabeth Booth, mother of Mr. Moore, was a daughter of John N. and Annie (Falkner) Booth. Mr. Booth was of an old Virginia family and migrated to Georgia earlv in life. Mr. John N. Moore grew up on the farm and in 1858 married Hulda A. Falkner, born in 1830, daughter of James J. and Annie (Hardy) Falkner. Mr. Falkner was a native of Elbert county, but moved to Madison county in 1839, and was considered the best farmer in the county. He was a man of liberal education and son of William Falkner, a prominent figure in the early history of Virginia, and a large planter and slave-holder. Mr. and Mrs. Moore have eight children living: George, Fudge B., John, Anna, Dora, Mary, Fannie and Dollie. Mr. Moore and family belong to the Baptist church. Mr. Moore's capital at the beginning of life was very little, but hard work and perseverance have enabled him to accumulate much property. He owns a farm of 700 acres of excellent land near Comer, besides valuable gin and saw and grist-mills. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


S. P. POWER, farmer, Carlton, Madison Co., Ga., was born and has lived his life in Madison county. He is the son of D. B. and Margaret (Patten) Power, his father having been born in Elbert county and where he was an extensive farmer and slave-holder. The grandfather of Mr. S. P. Power was Frank Power, who came from Virginia and located in Elbert county. He was a brave soldier in the revolutionary war and an esteemed citizen. The wife of D. B. Power was the wife of Samuel and Margaret (Eberhart) Patten, and her father was a soldier during the war of independence and an early settler of Elbert county. Mr. S. P. Power was born in 1831, and obtained what schooling he received from a private tutor, after the day's work was done. In 1862 he joined the ranks of the Confederacy and became a member of Company E, Thirty- seventh Georgia regiment, under Capt. Gholston, being engaged in the fights at Tazewell, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and then going on detail duty. In 1853 he married Martha, daughter of Berry M. and Elizabeth (Vaughn) David. Six children have been born to this union, who are now living: David, William, James 0., Lorena, S. P. and Clinton. The mother was born in 1834. They are both members of the Baptist church and Mr. Power has long belonged to the masonic fraternity. He has served as bailiff for a number of years, and is well known throughout the county. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


W. W. SCOTT. Among the leading farmers of Madison county is W. W. Scott, of Danielsville. He was born in MadIson county in 1820, and is the son of John and Jane (Milligan) Scott. John Scott was born in North Carolina, of which state his parents were natives, and came to Georgia at an early day, settling in Madison county, where he farmed and engaged in trading with great pecuniary success. He left his plow to serve in the second war with Great Britain, and a few years after his return was elected to the office of sheriff of Madison county. He was re-elected a number of terms and in that day was the leading man of the county. He married a daughter of Andrew and Lillie (Cloghorn) Milligan. Mr. Milligan was a native of Virginia and served throughout the revolutionary war as a private, and won fame for his fearless courage in several battles. The early life of W. W. Scott was that of the usual farmer boy, and when fifteen years of age he followed in the footsteps of his ancestors and shouldered a musket and went out and fought the Cherokee Indians in the war of 1831. In 1841 he was married to Mary J. Daniel, a daughter of James Daniel, a well-to-do farmer of Madison county. Mrs. Scott was born in 1825 and her demise occurred in 1856. She was a noble Christian woman, belonging to the Presbyterian church, and a loving wife and mother. By this marriage the following living children were born: Thomas J., Elizabeth F., John C., James D. and Mary. In 1860 Mr. Scott was married to Sarah Davenport, who was born in Wilkes county and died in 1886 at an advanced age. Mr. Scott's third marriage was to Sarah, daughter of John and Nancy (Stanton) Dixon. She was born in Elbert county in 1842. Mr. Dixon was a native of and died in Elbert county and was a prosperous farmer. Mrs. Scott is a member of the M. E. church, while her husband is of the Presbyterian faith and a lifelong member of the masonic order. Mr. Scott has always taken an interest in politics, though never aspiring to office, and in 1877 was a representative of his county in the constitutional convention. Mr. Scott, like so many other farmers of the south after the war, found himself ruined, but with indomitable energy went to work and soon recovered his losses and added greatly to them, having a fine farm of 4,000 acres at the present time. Mr. Scott served in the Confederate army in the late war, first as private, then as captain, elected by the men, and was afterward promoted to the rank of major of his regiment. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


DR. B. M. THOMPSON, a prominent physician of Madison county, Ga., whose home is at Thompson's Mills, near Five Forks, is a native of the county, a son of William and Mary (Tilman) Thompson, and was born in 1821. His paternal great-grandparents were natives, respectively, of Ireland and Scotland, and on coming to this country settled in Pennsylvania. His paternal grandparents were Alexander and Mary (Hodge) Thompson. He was born in Pennsylvania, was a soldier during the revolutIonary war, migrated to North Carolina and afterward to Georgia. Dr. Thompson's father was born in Burke county, N. C., and came to Georgia in 1790 with his parents, who settled in Wilkes (now Oglethorpe) county. The mother of Dr. B. M. Thompson was a daughter of William and Mary (Farrow) Tilman. He came from South Carolina and located in Georgia soon after the revolutionary war, and settled in Burke county, where he reared his family. He afterward moved to Madison county, where he died. Dr. Thompson was reared on a farm, and in 1850 married Amanda J. Carithers, daughter of William C. and Mary (Griffith) Carithers. Her father was a South Carolinian and moved to Georgia and lived in Madison county till his death. They have two children: William H. and Mary B. The mother was born in 1832 and died in 1875. She was a woman much loved and was a sincere Christian lady. Dr. Thompson began reading medicine in 1843 under Dr. Culbertson and has practiced for fifty years. He first attended the Jefferson Medical college, Philadelphia, in 1844-5, and was then graduated from the Atlanta Medical college in 1856. The doctor enjoys an extended reputation for professional skill and has a very large practice. He owns about 1,900 acres of choice land near Five Forks, and a big mill on South river. He is the owner of a mill built by his grandfather in 1790, it being the first mill erected in Madison county. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


J. F. WHITE. The White family and its wide connections in Georgia descend from an old Virginia family that came to Georgia about the beginning of the present century. The great-grandfather of the present generation was Stephen H. White, who moved to Georgia with his parents when a boy. He was born in Virginia, was married to Lucy White and became a wealthy planter and large slave owner. His son, Isaiah M. White, married Sarah A. O'Kelley, and of this union was born J. F. White, whose memoir is here given. Isaiah White was a representative man of his time and a brave soldier in the Indian war of 1836 and the civil war. His wife was a daughter of James and Dicey (Stamfer) O'Kelley. Mr. O'Kelley was a native of Virginia, and moving to Georgia at an early day lived and died in Oglethorpe county. The great-grandfather on Mr. White's paternal grandmother's side was Page White, a native of Virginia and one of the prominent and wealthy planters of Georgia at the close of the last century. Mr. J. F. White was reared on the farm and received only a meager early education. He married Lucy, daughter of O. N. and Nancy (Smith) White, the father being a native of Georgia, a successful farmer and brave soldier in the late war . Mrs. White was born in Madison county, and a few years after marriage died, leaving three children: Lizzie, Nancy, and Stephen P. In 1892 Mr. White was married to Georgia Tucker, daughter of William A. and Mary (Johnston) Royston. The latter was a native of Franklin county, and was a successful farmer and merchant. They have one living child - Paul. Mrs. White was born in Franklin county, was a member of the Methodist church and a charitable woman. Mr. White's life has been spent on the farm, and his industry has been rewarded by the possession of a magnificent estate of 1,400 acres of land near Danielsville. He is a citizen respected by the community in which he lives and a man whose word is good as a bond. "Memoirs of Georgia: Containing Historical Accounts of the State's Civil, Military, Industrial and Professional Interests, and Personal Sketches of Many of Its People" Vol. 1 & 2, Atlanta, Georgia: The Southern Historical Association, 1895.


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